EPA 2020 Virtual Meeting

 

 
 

Welcome to the 2020 Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association! The year 2020 is the 125th anniversary of EPA. In addition to the traditional program of keynote addresses, symposia, papers and posters organized in several content areas, a number of special sessions have been created to highlight the history of psychological research, including the lecture by the Presidential Invited Keynote Speaker, Alexandra Rutherford (York University).

SESSIONS


All times are Eastern Time Printable Schedule || Times, presenters and sessions are subject to change.

6/17/2020

8:00 AM
-to-
8:10 AM


   
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Opening Remarks: EPA President Amy Learmonth


Amy  Learmonth

 

A very brief (2min) welcome to the virtual 2020 EPA Conference from current EPA President Amy Learmonth. This welcome will also run in all of the 8:00am sessions on June 17. There is also a short video (4min) from Program Committee Chair Jef Lamoureux on making the most from a virtual conference.

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6/17/2020

8:00 AM
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9:20 AM


   
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Clinical Psychology Keynote: Tina Maschi


Tina  Maschi

 

AGING BEHIND PRISON WALLS: HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES
TINA MASCHI (FORDHAM UNIVERSITY)
CHAIR: KEITH MORGEN

Over the past two decades there has been a growing awareness of the aging prison population crisis as a human rights and social justice issue. Issues addressed will include: (1) Life course stories of older adults with mental health concerns and relevant social/structural factors, (2) how issues such as trauma and resilience influence older adult prisoner access to services, rights, and justice, and (3) an exploration of individual, family, and community coping/resilience issues.


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6/17/2020

8:00 AM
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9:20 AM


   
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Behavioral Neuroscience Papers I: Appetitive and Aversive Learning


Michael  Steinfeld

 

CHAIR: MICHAEL STEINFELD

8:00am - 8:15am
RENEWAL OF GOAL-DIRECTED ACTIONS AND HABITS AFTER EXTINCTION
MICHAEL STEINFELD, MARK BOUTON (UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT)
Instrumental responses that have been extinguished are subject to renewal when the context is changed. To date, little research has asked whether this is true of behaviors that are goal-directed actions or habits. Four experiments assessed ABA and ABC renewal of responses that were extinguished after being trained as either actions or habits. The results confirm that extinction does not erase either action or habit learning, and that habits are context-specific, while actions are not.

8:20am - 8:35am
PRELIMBIC CORTEX INACTIVATION ATTENUATES OPERANT RESPONDING IN BOTH PHYSICAL AND BEHAVIORAL CONTEXTS
CALLUM THOMAS, ERIC THRAILKILL, MARK BOUTON, JOHN GREEN (UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT)
Operant behaviors are strongest when they are tested in the context in which they are learned. In rats, prelimbic cortex (PL) inactivation attenuates the performance of behaviors primarily in their acquisition contexts. Here, PL inactivation produced an analogous effect on the second behavior in a two-behavior chain provided it was tested in the “context” of the first behavior. The PL thus mediates the effects of acquisition contexts, whether physical or behavioral, on instrumental responding.

8:40am - 8:55am
NEURAL SOURCES OF AVERSIVE PREDICTION ERROR

RACHEL WALKER, MICHAEL MCDANNALD (BOSTON COLLEGE)
Aversive prediction errors are generated when there is a discrepancy between a predicted and received outcome, updating cue-outcome associations to alter future behavior. Using optogenetics to inhibit at the time of either positive or negative prediction error (PE), the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray was shown to generate positive PEs, and serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus were implicated in negative PE-related fear expression. Uncovering broader PE circuitry will inform greater understanding of the fear network.

9:00am - 9:15am
OPERATIONALIZING FEAR MEMORY STRENGTH

DAVID JOHNSON (YORK COLLEGE AND THE GRADUATE CENTER, CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK)
Fear learning research shows that threat reinforcement rate impacts conditioned responding during acquisition. However, it’s not clear if these responses index memory strength. Here, we tested the impact of reinforcement rate on acquisition, extinction and fear recovery response (n=38). Data suggests that acquisition responses reflect underlying memory strength for only the partially, but not fully, reinforced stimulus. These findings highlight that researchers should carefully consider the threat reinforcement rate in their experimental designs.


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6/17/2020

8:00 AM
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9:20 AM


   
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Teaching of Psychology Symposium: Faculty and Student Perspectives on Blended Format Courses


Richard  Harnish

 

CHAIR: RICHARD HARNISH

Come join us for an engaging session focused on active learning strategies that can be implemented in your blended course. Faculty and students will share their perspectives on a variety of strategies that used active learning to improve students' learning experience.

Presentations:
Blended Course Initiative at Penn State New Kensington
by Joy Krumenacker (Penn State University)

Blended Format in a Psychology Course
by Richard Harnish (Penn State University)

Student Perspectives
by Jessica Kurtz, Evan Yoder (Penn State University)


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6/17/2020

9:30 AM
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10:51 AM


   
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Learning and Behavioral Neuroscience Keynote: Steven Maier


Steven  Maier

 

BEHAVIORAL CONTROL:THE ROLES OF THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX IN MEDIATING RESILIENCE
STEVEN F. MAIER (UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BOULDER)
CHAIR: JOHN CHRISTIANSON

A number of experiences have been shown to produce resistance/resilience in the face of adversity. The experience of behavioral control over an adverse event is arguably the most potent, and blunts behavioral and neurochemical reactions not only to the adverse event being experienced, but to future adverse events as well. Research that reveals the neural mechanisms that produce this present and future resistance/resilience will be reviewed, and will focus on two circuits, both of which include the medial prefrontal cortex—one that detects the presence of control and one that then uses this information to inhibit limbic and brainstem stressor-responsive structures. The implications of this work will then be used to discuss mechanisms of resistance/resilience more generally, and other manipulations that produce resistance/resilience.


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6/17/2020

9:30 AM
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10:50 AM


   
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Clinical Psychology: Paper Session I


Mary Elizabeth  Ruggiero

 

CHAIR: ANTHONY SCIOLI

9:30am - 9:45am
FORSAKING SUICIDALITY AND DEVELOPING SELF-FORGIVENESS: A TREATMENT FOR ADULTS STRUGGLING W/MORAL INJURY
MARY ELIZABETH RUGGIERO (WILLIAM JAMES COLLEGE)
The purpose of this presentation will be to discuss an eight-week skill based group treatment manual that was developed, Learning to Heal. This manual was developed for adults struggling with suicidality, as a response to their wrongdoings and moral injury. This presentation will provide an in depth discussion of the literature and current research, including various theories of suicidality, the methodology taken to create the treatment manual, the results, and the future clinical implications.

9:50am - 10:05am
RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SOCIAL MEDIA, SELF-INJURY, AND ADDITIONAL MENTAL HEALTH FACTORS
REBECCA GEBERT, NATHAN LOWRY, COLLEEN JACOBSON (IONA COLLEGE)
Social media (SM) use can negatively impact mental well-being and is linked to depression, anxiety, stress, and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). This study investigated the relationships between SM behaviors and depression, anxiety, stress, and NSSI. 668 young adults completed an investigator-designed measure, the Comprehensive Assessment of Social Media Use (CASM), and other measures to assess well-being. Significant correlations arose between all SM behaviors and depression, anxiety, and stress. Those who self-harmed reported increased SM use.

10:10am - 10:25am
ASSESSMENT OF HOPELESSNESS AND FALSE HOPE:DEVELOPMENT OF TWO NEW INSTRUMENTS
ANTHONY SCIOLI, VANESSA NICHOLS, CHANEL CLARK, SARAH FLOWER, JORDYN UPRIGHT, VERONICA PARIS, ELIZABETH PILGRIM-O'HARE (KEENE STATE COLLEGE)
Scioli and Biller (2009) introduced a multidimensional model of hopelessness, reflecting disruptions in attachment, survival, or mastery. Drawing on this model, we have developed two measures, one to assess nine types of hopelessness, and another to detect false hope. Data is presented on the reliability and validity of the Hoplessness-45 (HL-45). A measure of false hope is presented that is inversely related to hopelessness and neuroticism but positively correlated with self-deception.


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6/17/2020

9:30 AM
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10:50 AM


   
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Teaching of Psychology Papers: Community and Career Concerns


Michelle  Schmidt

 

CHAIR: NATASHA SEGOOL

9:30am - 9:45am
INTEGRATING COMMUNITY-BASED RESEARCH INTO A PSYCHOLOGY SEMINAR
MICHELLE SCHMIDT (MORAVIAN COLLEGE)
A model for a community-based research project in an upper level developmental psychology seminar will be discussed. Students worked with the local YMCAs to create a study of summer camp effectiveness. Students investigated research behind the goals of the camps (belongingness, achievement, relationship building) and explored methodologies to investigate these variables. Y staff visited the seminar four times throughout the semester. The end product was a collaboratively created study that was subsequently carried out.

9:50am - 10:05am
EFFECTS OF LEARNING COMMUNITY AND COHORT PROGRAMS WITHIN A PSYCHOLOGY-WRITING PARTNERSHIP

NATASHA SEGOOL, MARGARET TARAMPI, BETH RICHARDS, JESSICA NICKLIN, JUSTIN KOWALSKI (UNIVERSITY OF HARTFORD)
Recognizing that writing is an essential learning outcome for psychology majors, this study examined the effect of providing writing instruction for Psychology majors through specially designed courses. This study tested instruction through curriculum-based Learning Communities (LC) and Major-specific cohorts of first-year psychology majors in comparison to instruction through University general education sections. LC and Cohorts were designed to enhance learning and/or community connections among psychology majors. Results suggest promising relational and learning effects.


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6/17/2020

9:30 AM
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10:50 AM


   
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Psi Chi and Teaching Symposium: Psychology as Teaching Preparation


Helena  Swanson

 

CHAIR: HELENA SWANSON

9:30am - 9:45am
CAREER PATHWAYS AND THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR
KAREN STAMM, JESSICA CONROY, LUONA LIN, PEGGY CHRISTIDIS (AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION)
Psychology represents one of the most popular undergraduate majors nationally, with about 125,000 degrees awarded annually. Nevertheless, the connection between psychology and the workforce is not always clear, nor is there a set career trajectory that students follow. This presentation will describe career pathways and workforce outcomes for psychology undergraduates, including graduate degree attainment and common occupations. It will provide suggestions for psychology faculty to address gaps in career assistance available to undergraduate students.

9:50am - 10:05am
THE SKILLFUL PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT
JASON YOUNG (HUNTER COLLEGE)
Recently, the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Associate and Baccalaureate Education (CABE) commissioned a group of educators in psychology to identify how studying psychology develops employer-valued skills--cognitive, communication, personal, social, and technological skills. In this session, one of the authors will describe how to become aware of these skills, work with your academic advisor to identify opportunities to develop the skills, and learn how to market these skills to potential employers. (https://www.apa.org/ed/precollege/psn/2019/02/skillful-student)


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6/17/2020

9:30 AM
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10:50 AM


   
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Community Psychology: Paper Session


Michele  Schlehofer

 

CHAIR: MICHELE SCHLEHOFER

9:30am - 9:45am
PARENTS’ REPORTS OF SCHOOL EXPERIENCES OF TRANSGENDER AND GENDER NON-CONFORMING CHILDREN

MICHÈLE SCHLEHOFER, ASHLEY OLORTEGUI, JESSICA HARBAUGH (SALISBURY UNIVERSITY)
This study explored how parents of TGNC youth (N = 29) perceived their child’s school experiences, and their decisions regarding school environment. Parents reported three challenges in schools: their child’s appearance and gender expression, pronoun and name choice, and bathroom use. Parents who were more deeply involved in changing school climate were less likely to subsequently transfer their child or homeschool.

9:50am - 10:05am
INCARCERATED WOMEN’S POST-TRAUMATIC HELP-SEEKING FOR INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE

JANEL LEONE, MARISA BEEBLE (RUSSELL SAGE COLLEGE)
This study examined incarcerated women’s strategic responses to adult interpersonal violence prior to incarceration. Findings revealed that most participants utilized some type of help; 79% sought formal help (e.g., police) and 78% sought informal help (e.g., family). Severity of coercive control and consequences associated with victimization, specifically perceived social support, most strongly predicted help-seeking. Understanding women’s post-traumatic help-seeking is critical for future service provision, and police and legal system intervention in cases of interpersonal violence.


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6/17/2020

9:30 AM
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10:50 AM


   
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Developmental Papers: Motor & Cognition


Aaron   DeMasi

 

CHAIR: LAUREN BRYANT (COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS)

9:30am - 9:45am
FIRST STEPS: USING THE NANIT BABY MONITOR TO CLASSIFY NOCTURNAL INFANT MOVEMENTS

AARON DEMASI (THE GRADUATE CENTER AT THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK), SARAH BERGER (THE COLLEGE OF STATEN ISLAND AT THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK)
Infants spend most of their time asleep, therefore, most of their development takes place at night in the crib. Using movement as a window into psychological development, the current study tests the feasibility of manually coding motor behaviors using Nanit video baby monitoring technology to qualify and quantify an infant’s movements in the crib. The method was feasible and showed that, on the night before his first steps, an infant practiced gross motor movements.

9:50am - 10:05am
LEARNING TO THINK BY LEARNING TO MOVE

NANCY RADER (ITHACA COLLEGE)
Koziol’s theory of brain development links locomotion with executive function (EF). To examine this relationship, we randomly assigned 5-month-old pre-crawling infants to a locomotor or non-locomotor control group. During 12 sessions, the locomotor group used a robotic device to navigate to toy locations while toys for the control group were in reach. At 7 months, we assessed performance on an EF task. The locomotor group performed better and scores correlated with time locomoting.

10:10am - 10:25am
REWARD SENSITIVITY COUNTERACTS THE EFFECTS OF INCENTIVES ON EARLY CHILDHOOD EXECUTIVE FUNCTION

LAUREN BRYANT (COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS), KIMBERLY CUEVAS (UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT)
Executive functions (EFs) are higher-order processes that control behavior and cognition. Incentives generally enhance adult EFs, especially for individuals with high reward sensitivity. However, it is unclear whether this factor plays a similar role in early reward-EF associations. Preschool children completed rewarded and non-rewarded versions of a Stroop-like task. Rewards enhanced children’s EFs, but contrary to adult findings, these effects were smaller for reward-sensitive children. These findings will be discussed in terms of attentional control.

10:30am - 10:45am
ASSESSING ATTENTION IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES IN-OFFICE AND ONLINE

NANCY HUGUENIN (BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS & TECHNOLOGY, INC.)
Prior reinforcement histories of separate stimulus components determined which features of stimulus compounds young children of typical development and adolescents with developmental disabilities attended to. The children attended to symbols in the compounds with an unchanged prior reinforcement history. The adolescents, because of overselective attention, required extended training before they attended to the unchanged symbols. Prior reinforcement histories also controlled how participants attended to a stimulus compound when procedures were provided online.


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6/17/2020

11:00 AM
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12:20 PM


   
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Community Psychology Keynote: Jacob Kraemer Tebes


Jacob  Kraemer Tebes

 

USING A POPULATION HEALTH PERSPECTIVE TO TRANSFORM COMMUNITIES
JACOB KRAEMER TEBES (YALE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE)
CHAIR: ROBEY B. CHAMPINE, PHD

Community psychology seeks to transform communities to promote health, well-being, and social justice. Community transformation can involve entire cities and towns as well as neighborhoods and other social settings, such as schools. Increasingly, community psychologists are drawing on population health science to conceptualize community transformation because it aligns well with community psychology principles, practice, and research. In this talk, I briefly describe key principles of population health science that inform efforts at community transformation and how these align with community psychology. I then provide three research examples that illustrate how a population health perspective can guide implementation and evaluation of community transformation. These include: 1) a school district- and community-wide initiative to build a resilient, trauma-informed community to address the effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs); 2) a neighborhood arts-based initiative to reduce the negative health impacts of neighborhood decay and disorder; and 3) a school-wide social norms initiative to prevent substance use and promote adoption of healthy lifestyles among youth. Each initiative also illustrates how the active participation of public stakeholders in community transformation can enhance implementation and impact.


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6/17/2020

11:00 AM
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12:20 PM


   
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International Psychology Papers


Padmini   Banerjee

 

CHAIR: NILOFER NAQVI

11:00am - 11:15am
STUDYING DISLOCATED LIVES: A COMPARATIVE EXAMINATION OF ESTABLISHED AND EVOLVING RESEARCH APPROACHES
PADMINI BANERJEE (DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY)
Refugees and displaced populations have acquired new urgency and salience in recent times and across borders precipitated by geo-political, socio-cultural and environmental realities and concerns. There is an articulated need to understand the larger implications of these developments. Research studies have proliferated, crossing disciplines and methodological traditions, begging closer scrutiny and examination of their approaches. Some of these trends are examined here, with examples, and implications explored for researchers and the field as a whole.

11:20am - 11:35am
HIGH VALUE AND THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SIGNIFICANCE: SPEECH OF THE SUFFERING SOUL

CHRIS STEED (WINCHESTER UNIVERSITY UK)
‘Psychopathology,' diseases of the mind, derives from ‘psyche’, ‘pathos’ and ‘logos’: literally, ‘speech of the suffering soul’. Amidst multi-dimensional complexity of human behaviour, private as well as public worlds demonstrate that we are not just interest-led. Human action is shaped by the desire to sustain our value and protest when breached. What is the energy for this? Where can we locate in psychological literature the role that a valuable self plays in mental architecture?

11:40am - 11:55am
PROTECTING ANIMALS, SAVING SPECIES: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE TO SUPPORT GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY

DIANE P. GENEREUX (BROAD INSTITUTE OF MIT AND HARVARD)
Our 200 Mammals Project, an international collaboration, is pioneering data-collection strategies to inform species conservation using DNA samples collected during veterinary care --- with minimal impact on the sampled individual. In doing so, we are establishing new standards to protect both individual animals and entire species, addressing a moral imperative in this era of anthropogenic extinction.

12:00pm - 12:15pm
INCREASING AUTISM AWARENESS IN TANZANIA THROUGH A MOBILE PHONE TRAINING PROGRAM

NILOFER NAQVI, LEIGH KONAK, MEGAN RICCI, CASSIDY MAHONEY (IONA COLLEGE)
Educators in Mwanza, Tanzania currently have access to a free training on Autism via their mobile devices. The content of the training includes etiology, assessment, teaching strategies and behavior modification and is available in English and Swahili. A total of 118 users have accessed the training with a completion rate of approximately 30%. Results will highlight demographic information of users, pre and post-test learning outcomes, and an exploration into the content areas with highest usership.


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6/17/2020

11:00 AM
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12:21 PM


   
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Clinical Psychology: Paper Session II


Nicholas   Wagner

 

CHAIR: JOHN DONAHUE

11:00am - 11:15am
DEFICITS IN SOCIAL IMITATION AS AN EARLY PRECURSOR TO CALLOUS-UNEMOTIONAL TRAITS
NICHOLAS WAGNER (BOSTON UNIVERSITY), REBECCA WALLER (UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA), MEGAN FLOM (BOSTON UNIVERSITY), SAMUEL RONFARD (UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO), SUSAN FENSTERMACHER (UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT), KIMBERLY SAUDINO (BOSTON UNIVERSITY)
Impairments in affiliative processes are implicated in the etiology of callous-unemotional traits, interpersonal and affective deficits which pose increased risk for later offending. Using a longitudinal twin study (N = 628), we show that less observed arbitrary imitation of others’ actions at age 2, behaviors which function to promote social bonds, uniquely predict later CU traits, and that only genetic factors contribute to these links. Implications for future research and personalized treatment are discussed.

11:20am - 11:35am
FEARLESSNESS AND LOW SOCIAL AFFILIATION AS UNIQUE DEVELOPMENTAL PRECURSORS OF CALLOUS-UNEMOTIONAL

REBECCA WALLER (UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA), NICHOLAS WAGNER, MEGAN FLOM (BOSTON UNIVERSITY), JODY GANIBAN (GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY), KIMBERLY SAUDINO (BOSTON UNIVERSITY)
Callous-unemotional behaviors identify children at risk for severe and persistent antisocial behavior. In a sample of preschoolers (N=620), observed fearlessness and low social affiliation uniquely predicted increases in callous-unemotional behaviors, but not oppositional-defiant behaviors, from ages 3 to 5. Harsh parenting predicted increases in callous-unemotional behaviors in fearless children but increases in oppositional-defiant behaviors in fearful children. Treatments for CU behaviors and aggression should target socioaffiliative processes and provide parents strategies to promote rule-compliant behavior.

11:40am - 11:55am
RISKY SEXUAL BEHAVIORS AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FLEXIBILITY PROCESSES IN A COMMUNITY SAMPLE
JOHN DONAHUE, DINA ISMAILOVA, KATIE CALLAHAN, CIERA KING, NICOLE BIRFER, UGOCHINYERE ONYEUKWU, JARID WATSON (UNIVERSITY OF BALTIMORE), VIKTOR NOWACK (VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY)
Risky sexual behavior (RSB) refers to sexual activity that is potentially harmful to one’s health. Psychological (in)flexibility is a transdiagnostic process that may be important in the etiology and maintenance of numerous behavioral problems. While linked theoretically, we are aware of no prior studies that have examined this construct in relation to RSB. The present study’s aim is to examine the association between psychological (in)flexibility dimensions and a range of RSBs.


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6/17/2020

11:00 AM
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12:20 PM


   
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Behavioral Neuroscience Symposium: Women in Learning


Jennifer  Perusini

 

CHAIR & SPEAKER: JENNIFER PERUSINI

Brief overview of the history, goals, and future of the Women in Learning organization.


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6/17/2020

11:00 AM
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Teaching of Psychology Symposium: Teaching Attitudes and Behaviors of Novice College Instructors


Patricia J.  Brooks

 

CHAIR: PATRICIA J. BROOKS

Graduate students often serve as instructors of undergraduate psychology courses, yet few studies have examined their teaching attitudes in relation to their self-reported teaching practices. This symposium reports findings from two surveys distributed through the Graduate Student Teaching Association assessing approaches to teaching, model teaching characteristics, emphasis on workforce-relevant skills, and awareness of students’ academic motivations. Results indicate tensions between skills vs. content knowledge with many instructors failing to utilize high-impact practices (e.g., research).

Presentations:
Do Approaches to Teaching Reflect Authoritarianism and Big 5 Traits?

by Anna M. Schwartz (Boston College)
Do Graduate Student Teachers Exhibit Model Teaching Characteristics?
by Ethlyn S. Saltzman (The Graduate Center, CUNY)
Are Novice Instructors Teaching Workforce Readiness?
by Elizabeth S. Che (College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center, CUNY)
Is it Important for Graduate Student Teachers to be Aware of the Goals and Motivations of their Students?
by Ronald C. Whiteman (Baruch College, CUNY)

Discussant: Patricia J. Brooks (College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center, CUNY)


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6/17/2020

11:00 AM
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Cognitive Psychology Papers I


Lindsey  Lilienthal

 

CHAIR: LINDSEY LILIENTHAL (PENN STATE ALTOONA)

11:00am - 11:15am
PROACTIVE INTERFERENCE AND DISTINCTIVENESS: EFFECTS ON INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN VISUOSPATIAL WORKING MEMORY

LINDSEY LILIENTHAL (PENN STATE ALTOONA)
Previous research has shown that increasing the distinctiveness of items can reduce proactive interference and improve memory performance. This study investigated whether this benefit would be greater for individuals with low working-memory spans, as they are typically more susceptible to proactive interference than individuals with higher spans. The results of two experiments showed that although all participants benefited from increasing the distinctiveness of to-be-remembered locations, low spans indeed benefited more than high spans.

11:20am - 11:35am
THE ROLE OF SUBVOCALIZATION IN PITCH SHORT-TERM MEMORY

EMMA GREENSPON (MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY), SIMON GORIN (UNIVERSITY OF GENEVA)
We used a standard/comparison memory task with melodies presented with either a synthesized or real human voice. Motor interference tasks were completed during the maintenance phase between the standard and comparison melody that either disrupted the vocal system (silently repeating syllables) or disrupted a non-vocal motor system (finger tapping). We found a memory advantage for melodies presented with a real human voice in the non-vocal motor interference task, which was absent during vocal motor interference.

11:40am - 11:55am
CAN ADULTS BE TAUGHT TO PRODUCE NON-NATIVE PHONEMIC CONTRASTS?

ANA BENNETT (RUTGERS UNIVERSITY), TERRY KIT-FONG AU (HONG KONG UNIVERSITY), KARIN STROMSWOLD (RUTGERS UNIVERSITY)
Adults have great difficulty mastering second language (L2) phonologies. The Critical Period Hypothesis argues this is due to their diminished neural plasticity, whereas the Input Hypothesis argues that this is due to their receiving inadequate L2 input. This study supports the Input Hypothesis, as it shows that with intensive perceptual training on English phonemic contrasts, Cantonese-speaking adults (whose L2 is English) produce these phonemes in a manner that is acoustically similar to native English speakers.

12:00pm - 12:15pm
ACUTE STRESS IMPROVES ANALOGICAL REASONING: THE ROLES OF STRESS HORMONES AND MEMORY

GRACE ELLIOTT, GREGORY HUGHES, TAD BRUNYE (TUFTS UNIVERSITY), AMY SMITH (QUINNIPIAC UNIVERSITY)
Extant research suggests that acute stress can hinder performance on both problem-solving tasks and tests of long-term memory. Analogical reasoning, a type of problem solving predicated on the successful retrieval of applicable information, provides a means of dissociating long-term memory performance from the ability to apply that information to solve a novel problem. In this study we examined the effects of stress on analogical reasoning to identify when in the problem-solving process stress influences performance.


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6/17/2020

11:00 AM
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Applied Papers: Well-Being


Joseph  Ferrari

 

CHAIR: SUSAN AVERNA

11:00am - 11:15am
HOPE AND HEALTHY HABITS: PREDICTORS OF SUCCESSFUL LIFESTYLE BEHAVIORS
DN. JOSEPH R. FERRARI (DEPAUL UNIVERSITY), REBECCA MCGARITY-PALMER (DEPAUL UINIVERSITY)
It seems “hope springs eternal,” especially focused on health habits. Most people believe they have lots of time and many options to engage in healthy eating and exercise. We examined self-reported healthy habits and behavioral tendencies of hope (using the Scioli et al. 2011 scale) with 240 young adults. Results found that hope predicted physical activity but not healthy eating. We then examined specific subscales of the Hope Scale on both health behaviors and eating.

11:20am - 11:35am
EFFECTIVENESS OF A COLLEGE COURSE DESIGNED TO INCREASE STUDENT WELL-BEING
SUSAN AVERNA (TRINITY COLLEGE)
In response to high rates of depression, anxiety, and stress levels in college students (Auerbach et al., 2018) one option is to integrate wellness courses into the curriculum. This study assesses the effectiveness of an elective for-credit course designed to teach and guide students in a variety of self-care practices. Results reveal a reduction in perfectionism and anxiety and an increased ability to address habits that interfere with academics and well-being.

11:40am - 11:55am
DEVELOPMENT OF EARLY CHILDHOOD SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL SKILLS: TRAJECTORIES, ANTECEDENTS, AND OUTCOMES
ROLAND S. REYES, SHARON WOLF, EMILY M. WEISS, PAUL A. MCDERMOTT (UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA)
Little is known about how social-emotional skills emerge for children living in developing countries. We examine the social-emotional development of 1,916 preschoolers in Ghana over three years and identify two meaningful growth trajectories that are significantly associated with later academic and non-academic outcomes. Boys and poorer children were more likely to be in the low-growth class. This study presents the first results of social-emotional trajectories, and their implications, for children in sub-Saharan Africa.

12:00pm - 12:15pm
WELL-BEING IN FAMILIES OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER: THE EARLY YEARS
CATHERINE MELLO (THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, BERKS), MELINA RIVARD (UNIVERSITE DU QUEBEC A MONTREAL), CELINE MERCIER (UNIVERSITE DE MONTREAL)
Family quality of life (FQOL) was assessed in 277 families of preschool-aged children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the early childhood portion of their services trajectory. Participation in a parental coaching program, but not early behavioral intervention (EBI), was linked to higher FQOL. EBI itself may have more limited, and less durable, impacts on family functioning. The service needs and opportunities highlighted by these findings are discussed in a context of limited public resources.


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6/17/2020

11:00 AM
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Social Psychology Papers I: Gender


Amelie  Martinie

 

CHAIR: PHYLLIS ANASTASIO

11:00am - 11:15am
A UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE ON THE BECHDEL TEST
AMELIA MARTINIE, ALEXANDRYA POPE (SAINT JOSEPH'S UNIVERSITY)
The Bechdel test measures whether two female characters in a movie talk about something other than a man. However, this test is inherently limited, since it does not measure the content of the individual conversations. In this rethought Bechdel test, conversations between men were coded for their stereotypically masculine content when women are present or absent. Overall men were found to speak significantly more stereotypically than non-stereotypically, but this effect disappeared when women were present.

11:20am - 11:35am
GENDER DIFFERENCES IN PERCEPTIONS OF SAME-SEX AND OPPOSITE-SEX INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

ERIC FRAZIER, KAYLA BARILLAS, EDWARD GORSKI, EVAN BASTING, ELIZABETH GONCY (CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY)
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a growing concern in today's society. Prior research mainly focuses on IPV within heterosexual couples, despite evidence of IPV among same-sex couples. The purpose of this study is to examine college students’ perceptions of IPV in both heterosexual and same-sex couples. We hypothesize IPV will be evaluated as less severe in same-sex couples compared to heterosexual couples. Results and implications will be discussed.

11:40am - 11:55am
“MEN AND WOMEN” OR “WOMEN AND MEN?” TRENDS IN PRONOUN ORDER
PHYLLIS ANASTASIO, AMELIA MARTINIE, ZOE MAAS, DAVID SWEENEY, CAMILLE VASCONCELLOS (SAINT JOSEPH'S UNIVERSITY)
Phrases in which male nouns/pronouns precede their female counterparts are far more common than female-first phrases. Using Google NGram, we examined the ratio of six male-first/female-first phrases appearing in books since 1900. Strong negative correlations between year and male/female ratios were found for five phrases, indicating the relative usage of female-first phrases increased over time. However, the trend from 1990-2008 was for female-first pronouns to increase until 2002, after which their usage declined.


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6/17/2020

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Developmental Focus Papers: Development of Mathematical Cognition


Vinaya  Rajan

 

CHAIR: VINAYA RAJAN (UNIVERSITY OF THE SCIENCES)

Mathematics skills that children acquire at school entry are a robust predictor of later mathematics achievement and school achievement in general. In particular, proficiency in early number sense (i.e., skills related to number, number relations, and number operations) is foundational to building competence in mathematics. Presenters in this session will discuss their findings examining individual differences in early number competencies.

Presentations:
Executive Functions: Foundational Skills for Supporting Early Numeracy Development
by Vinaya Rajan (University of the Sciences), Nancy Jordan (University of Delaware)
Children’s Understanding of Cardinality: Insight from Counting Errors
by Anna Shusterman (Wesleyan University), Pierina Cheung (Singapore National Institute of Education), Sifana Sohail (University of California Irvine)


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6/17/2020

12:30 PM
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1:56 PM


   
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EPA Presidential Invited Symposium: Developmental Research for the Next 125 Years


Charles  Nelson

 

CHAIR: AMY LEARMONTH

DEVELOPMENTAL RESEARCH FOR THE NEXT 125 YEARS: UNDERSTANDING EARLY DEVELOPMENT IN ATYPICAL POPULATIONS
The future of developmental research will rely on understanding development in different populations as well as understanding normative development. This symposium will offer four different views of early development in atypical populations. From early identification of autism and identification of risks associated with early life stress to perceptual development in autism and developmental trajectories of children on the autism spectrum, these four talks will offer views of the current direction of developmental research.

Presentations:
A Cognitive Neuroscience Approach to Early Identification of Autism
by Charles Nelson (Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital)
Early Life Stress and the Developing Brain
by Amanda Tarullo (Boston University)
Visual Attentional Mechanisms in 2-year-olds with Autism Spectrum Disorder
by Zsuzsa Kaldy (UMass Boston)
Infant Crying, Arousal, and Regulation in Relation to Autism Outcomes
by Stephen Sheinkopf (Brown University)


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6/17/2020

12:30 PM
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International Psychology Symposium: Working with Asian Families in North America and at Home


Uwe  Gielen

 

CHAIR: DANIEL KAPLIN

WORKING WITH ASIAN FAMILIES IN NORTH AMERICA AND AT HOME: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE
In this symposium, we reflect on cultural factors related to Asian immigrant families. We begin with large-scale comparisons and become more specific about various Asian regions and Asian communities (e.g., Koreans, Japanese, etc.). After presenting this framework, we introduce cultural assessment and treatment using a culturagram and intersectional design tool (IDT). We conclude our presentation with various treatment modalities that can be used to address the core stressors Asian immigrant, refugee, and asylum-seeking families face.

Presentations:
Asian Immigrants to Canada and the United States
by Uwe Gielen (Professor Emeritus, St. Francis College)
Cultural Specificities of Korean Immigrants and Korean-Americans: Potential Factors Influencing Mental Health Outcomes
by Sunghun Kim (Associate Professor, St. Francis College)
Beyond the Culturagram: An Intersectional Approach
by Elaine Congress (Associate Dean and Professor, Fordham University)
Cultural Bases of Counseling and Psychotherapy
by Machiko Fukuhara (Professor, Tokiwa University, Japan)
Providing Therapy with Asian Immigrant Families
by Daniel Kaplin (Assistant Professor, St. Francis College)


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6/17/2020

12:30 PM
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Teaching of Psychology Symposium: Transformative Pedagogy


Jessica E.  Brodsky

 

CHAIR: JESSICA E. BRODSKY

Transformative pedagogy moves beyond the traditional “information-transmission” paradigm by empowering students through active, collaborative learning. This symposium introduces transformative learning strategies, including a flipped learning model, embedding quantitative reasoning throughout the curriculum, and using role-play to increase understanding of research ethics. Transformative approaches allow instructors to co-construct knowledge with students and link the curriculum with topics of local and global concern.

Presentations:
Using Authentic Data to Support Quantitative Reasoning in Introductory Psychology
by Jessica E. Brodsky (College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center, City University of New York)
Introducing Data Visualization Techniques Using Observational Language Corpora from the CHILDES Database
by Patricia J. Brooks (College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center, City University of New York)
The Transformative Power of Flipped Learning
by Jill Grose-Fifer (John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, City University of New York)
Exploring Ethics Through Role-play: Public Health Research at the Willowbrook State School and Tuskegee
by Elizabeth S. Che (College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center, City University of New York)


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6/17/2020

12:30 PM
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Social Psychology Papers II: Attitudes and Public Health


John  Hull

 

CHAIR: JESSICA CARLSON

12:30pm - 12:45pm
JUDGMENTS ABOUT WOMEN’S BODIES AS A FUNCTION OF RACE AND GENDER
JOHN HULL, DEBRA HULL (BETHANY COLLEGE), AZARIA DAVIS (SMITH COLLEGE)
Undergraduates rated pictures of women in magazines geared primarily toward Black, White, or Latina women for body size, femininity, strength, and attractiveness. Neither participant gender nor race interacted with ratings. Black women were seen as bigger and stronger than White women, but equally attractive and feminine. Latina women were seen as smallest, weakest, and most attractive. Findings suggest that Black women can provide a healthier cultural counterpoint to the hyper-White ideal for women’s bodies.

12:50pm - 1:05pm
WEIGHT-RELATED STEREOTYPES IN THE WORKPLACE: IMPLICATIONS FOR JOB ATTITUDES AND EFFICACY
JESSICA CARLSON, JASON SEACAT (WESTERN NEW ENGLAND UNIVERSITY)
Weight discrimination harms overweight/obese employees and is well documented in the workplace. Less clear are the consequences of exposure to negative weight-related stereotypes on obese employees. Using a vignette methodology, 200 male and female obese and normal weight university faculty and staff were experimentally tested. Overall, obese employees primed to think about their weight status reported lower levels of job satisfaction and organizational commitment, but not job efficacy, compared to normal weight employees.

1:10pm - 1:25pm
WHEN DIETING DOESN’T WORK: PREDICTING SNACK INTAKE AND BMI FROM EATING TRAITS
LINDSAY MORTON (MARYWOOD UNIVERSITY)
Overconsumption drives overweight and obesity problems in the United States. College women (N = 245) provided self-reports of eating traits, which were evaluated for their ability to uniquely predict food intake on a taste test and body mass index. A history of weight fluctuations and a focus on dieting behavior appear to be risk factors in this relationship. Policies and interventions may be able to target these variables, yet limitations necessitate future research.


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6/17/2020

2:00 PM
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Society for the Teaching of Psychology G. Stanley Hall Lecture


Daniel  Willingham

 

TEACHING CRITICAL THINKING: A COGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE
DANIEL WILLINGHAM (UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA)
CHAIR: JASON SPIEGELMAN

When asked to name our highest hope for schooling, most would suggest that we want to teach students to think critically; we don't want them merely to learn factual content, nor do we want them just to memorize formulae or algorithms to solve problems. We want them to be creative problem-solvers. Yet this hope seems to be seldom fulfilled. In this talk I will explain from a cognitive perspective why critical thinking is so difficult to teach, and suggest curricular and instructional strategies to get around these difficulties.


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6/17/2020

2:00 PM
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International Psychology Symposium: Educating Graduate Students About Global Issues at the UN


Elaine P.  Congress

 

CHAIR: ELAINE P. CONGRESS

The United Nations provides a valuable training ground for students to learn about international issues while developing their organizational practice, policy, and research skills. This symposium focuses on the experiences of graduate students who have an internship placement at the United Nations. The chair discusses the benefits as well as challenges in developing and leading a group of graduate level students at the United Nations. Using the SDG lens, students discuss what they have learned about policies and practice issues that affect vulnerable populations around the world. Populations and issues discussed will be health, women, children, indigenous peoples, migrants, intergenerational, and the digital divide.

Presentations:
Violence Against Women
by Anna Peverly (United Nations Association)
The Digital Divide and Education
by Shenesse Ali (Close the Gap NGO)
Vulnerable Populations - Indigenous and LGBTQ people
by Sydney Boyer (Unitarian Universalist Church NGO)


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6/17/2020

2:00 PM
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Learning Papers I: Habits, Extinction, and Recovery


Eric  Thrailkill

 

CHAIR: ERIC THRAILKILL

2:00pm - 2:15pm
GOAL-DIRECTED AND HABITUAL BEHAVIOR CHAINS IN RATS AND HUMANS
ERIC THRAILKILL, CATHERINE THORPE, MARK BOUTON (UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT)
Behavior chains are sequences of linked responses required to earn a reinforcer. Here we show in rats that R1 is sensitive to the value of R2 (a goal-directed action) and becomes insensitive (a habit) after extended training. We then show analogous findings with a novel computer task in human participants. The results implicate common associative mechanisms in instrumental learning across rats and humans and inform our understanding of how habits are made and broken.

2:20pm - 2:35pm
EXTINCTION, BUT NOT SPONTANEOUS RECOVERY, OF CONDITIONED FLAVOR PREFERENCES
ANDREW DELAMATER (BROOKLYN COLLEGE - CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK), JASMINE HUANG (MIDWOOD HIGH SCHOOL)
A conditioned flavor preference develops when a neutral flavor is paired with a nutrient. We previously demonstrated that this learned preference is highly sensitive to flavor nonreinforcement either prior to (latent inhibition), during (partial reinforcement), or following (extinction) flavor-nutrient pairings. Here we assess the role of the number of flavor-nutrient pairings prior to extinction, and the possibility of spontaneous recovery. Extinction in this paradigm is robust and appears not to spontaneously recover.

2:40pm - 2:55pm
RETROACTIVE INTERFERENCE: COUNTERCONDITIONING AND EXTINCTION WITH AND WITHOUT BIOLOGICALLY SIGNIFICANT OUTCOMES
YAROSLAV MOSHCHENKO, ALAINA BERRUTI, JACOB BLATTSTEIN (STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON), JÉRÉMIE JOZEFOWIEZ (UNIVERSITÉ DE LILLE), RALPH MILLER (STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BINGHAMTON)
Maladaptive Pavlovian conditioning (CS-Outcome1) is reduced through extinction (CS-alone) or counterconditioning (CS-Outcome2). Towards better understanding the underlying bases of these phenomena, particularly the reversal of evaluative conditioning during counterconditioning, extinction and counterconditioning were compared using a contingency preparation. The two phenomena differed appreciably in sensitivity to renewal as a function of whether the outcome(s) were biologically significant. Centrally, neutral outcomes in counterconditioning allow assessment of pure associative interference devoid of evaluative conditioning.


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6/17/2020

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Community Psychology: Workshop I


Samantha  Kent

 

CHAIR: SAMANTHA KENT

MENTAL HEALTH ACCESS AND CONTINUUM OF CARE FOR SERIOUSLY MENTALLY ILL OFFENDERS
SAMANTHA KENT, ASIA CHUAVIRIYA (UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN)

This roundtable will discuss the profound issue of untreated Serious Mental Illness (SMI) within the criminal justice system and its barriers. Individuals with SMI within the prison system make up 31% of the total prison population. More prevalent is the lack of mental health care within the prisons to aid these individuals. This deficit in care limits individuals' chances of success in the community upon reentry, increasing their likelihood of recidivism.


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6/17/2020

2:00 PM
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Social Psychology Symposium II: About Violence


D. Ryan  Schurtz

 

CHAIR: INGRID TULLOCH

This symposium is about violence presented from several sub-discipline perspectives in psychology. Using historical and modern examples, social psychologist D. Ryan Schurtz explains why envy and aggression can result in violence. Health psychologist Terra Bowen-Reid describes the psychophysiological consequences of vicarious social media violence. Ingrid K. Tulloch and Charlene Chester conclude with research from studies on sexual violence and the immune system. Also discussed are the biopsychosocial and developmental implications of these research findings.

Presentations:
The Envy and Aggression Link

by D. Ryan Schurtz (Stevenson University)
Subjective and Physiological Reactions to Vicarious Exposure to Racially Traumatic Events
by Terra Bowen-Reid (Morgan State University)
Sexual Violence and Baseline Immune Activity
by Ingrid K. Tulloch, Charlene Chester (Morgan State University)

Discussant: Ingrid Tulloch (Morgan State University)


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6/17/2020

3:30 PM
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Developmental Keynote: Charles Nelson


Charles  Nelson

 

SENSITIVE PERIODS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: THE EFFECTS OF EARLY PROFOUND DEPRIVATION
CHARLES NELSON (HARVARD UNIVERSITY)
CHAIR: KIMBERLY CUEVAS

Experience is the engine that drives much of postnatal brain development. When children are deprived of key (i.e., experience-expected) experiences, particularly during critical periods of development, brain and behavioral development can be derailed. There is perhaps no more egregious form of deprivation than being raised in large, state-run institutions. In my talk, I will introduce a project launched nearly 20 years ago, based in Bucharest, Romania. In the Bucharest Early Intervention Project three groups of Romanian children are being studied: infants abandoned to institutions and who remain in institutional care; infants abandoned to institutions but then placed in high quality foster care; and infants who have never been institutionalized. These three groups have been studied through age 16, with a 20 year follow up being planned. In my talk I will introduce the overall project, including its conceptual framework, its experimental design, the ethics involved in conducting this work and the nature of the intervention we deployed. I will then briefly summarize findings from several key domains, including cognitive development, social-emotional development, psychopathology, brain development and stress physiology.


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6/17/2020

3:30 PM
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International Psychology Symposium: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences at the UN


Harold  Takooshian

 

CHAIR: FLORENCE L. DENMARK

PSYCHOLOGY AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES AT THE UNITED NATIONS
What are the growing roles of psychology and behavioral science organizations at the United Nations? In this symposium, experienced experts offer their overview of this question-- the origin, history, and current status of behavioral science organizations working with the UN.

Presentations:
History of Psychological Science at the United Nations
by Harold Takooshian (Fordham University)
37 years of Social Work Day at the United Nations
by Elaine P. Congress (Fordham University)
Working with DGC--the UN Department of Global Communications
by Comfort Asanbe (CUNY College of Staten Island)


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6/17/2020

3:30 PM
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Clinical Psychology: Symposium I


Kee-Hong  Choi

 

CHAIR: SYLVIA CORBERA LOPEZ (CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY)

THE PAIN OF BEING REJECTED: UNDERSTANDING THE FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE EXPERIENCED AND VICARIOUS SOCIAL EXCLUSION
The present symposium aims to examine the topic of social rejection in different populations and using different experimental paradigms. Social rejection, which also can be conceptualized as social exclusion/ostracism and bullying and peer-victimization, both in real life or in the internet, can cause significant personal distress and discomfort, and its painful effects have been compared to those of physical pain. In this symposium, we propose to examine the topic of social rejection from three perspectives, in three different populations, and using three experiments. Each of these studies share in common the Cyberball as a probe of response to social exclusion. The three studies will discuss their findings in the context of psychosocial functioning and treatment, and will discuss venues for future directions in this field.

Presentations:
Reduced Responsiveness to Social Ostracism in Individuals with Schizophrenia with High Negative Symptoms

by Kee-Hong Choi (Korea University), Silvia Corbera Lopez (Central Connecticut State University), Hyunju Oh (Korea University)
Feasibility Study on the Effects of Stress in Vicarious Ostracism
by Silvia Corbera Lopez, Aaron Tiscione, Cassandra Camilli, Dawn Masterson (Central Connecticut State University), Courtney Dicocco (Yale University), Kee-Hong Choi (Korea University), Michael Crowley (Yale University)


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6/17/2020

3:30 PM
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Teaching of Psychology Symposium: Psychology Department Chair Roundtable


Amy  Hunter

 

CHAIR: AMY HUNTER

PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT CHAIR ROUNDTABLE: EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT BEING A DEPARTMENT CHAIR BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK
This informal session will provide current department chairs with an opportunity to discuss common issues and concerns as well as provide potential chairs with an “inside scoop” on life as a psychology department chair.

Panel:
Amy Hunter (Seton Hall University)
Keith Morgen (Centenary University)
Anthony Drago (East Stroudsburg University)


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6/17/2020

3:30 PM
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Community Psychology: Workshop II


Marisa  Aspromonti

 

CHAIR: MARISA ASPROMONTI

ENGAGING MEN IN SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION PROGRAMS ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES
MARISA ASPROMONTI, NATALIA MIASEK (UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN)

High rates of sexual assault on college campus is a major public health issue that calls for new, adaptive programs that can reach the broader university communities in the United States. New approaches to sexual assault prevention bring attention to the importance of targeting potential perpetrators and young men. This roundtable will discuss the importance of male engagement in sexual assault prevention programs and counseling as a way to reduce the risk of future perpetration.


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6/17/2020

5:00 PM
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International Psychology Keynote: Barry Schneider


Barry  Schneider

 

ADOLESCENT SUICIDE IN CUBA: ARE THE ATTEMPTERS DESPERATE, DEPRESSED, LONELY AND/OR ASHAMED?
BARRY SCHNEIDER (BOSTON COLLEGE)
CHAIR: HAROLD TAKOOSHIAN

Until recently, suicide rates were among the highest in the world. Adolescent suicide remains a major public-health problem, with official adolescent suicide rates reported to be as high as those in the U.S. Literary and historical sources depict suicide as a recurring theme since the Spanish conquest. The political and economic context since the independence of Cuba has been punctuated by recurring cycles of hope and disillusionment, which may relate to suicide at the individual level. The lack of incentive for individual initiative in the current social and economic structure of the country may be a contributing factor. This study, conducted with the approval of the health and educational authorities, features a comparison of adolescent suicide attempters, in the community and a day hospital, with their counterparts in regular public secondary schools, in terms of depression, loneliness, hopelessness, shame, rumination, thought suppression and mindfulness. The session focuses on the social, economic and educational systems and concludes with some ideas as to how they can contribute to suicide prevention.


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6/17/2020

5:00 PM
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Social Psychology Papers III: Emotions and Relationships


Alexandra  Beauchamp

 

CHAIR: PATRICK DWYER

5:00pm - 5:15pm
SCIENCE UNCERTAINTY: IF AND HOW INDIVIDUALS SEARCH FOR SCIENTIFIC MEANING UNDER THREAT

ALEXANDRA BEAUCHAMP (WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY), MATTHEW WILKINSON, DOMINIK MISCHKOWSKI (OHIO UNIVERSITY)
The threat generated by critical, societal issues can intensify feelings of uncertainty, and trigger sense-making motivations. Under these conditions, lack of scientific consensus may degrade one’s ability to use science as an explanatory strategy. Two studies examine how individuals may use expressions of scientific consensus to reduce feelings of uncertainty when under threat. By understanding the way the public uses science for sense-making, science communicators can more effectively address science denialism.

5:20pm - 5:35pm
TESTING WHETHER BJW MEDIATES THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CA AND SE
SAMANTHA SMITH, MEGAN CHESIN, MICHELE CASCARDI (WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY)
Belief in a just world (BJW) may explain the relationship between childhood emotional abuse (EA) and self-esteem (SE). Prior studies show that BJW is positively associated with SE and EA is negatively associated with BJW and SE. Formal mediation testing has not previously been conducted. This study tested whether BJW mediated the negative association between EA and SE in college students. EA and BJW were both associated with SE as expected, mediation was not supported.

5:40pm - 5:55pm
THE EFFECT OF LEISURE ACTIVITY ON MATE ATTRACTIVENESS
LARRY DAILY, JAMES JOYNER, MICHAELA CARPER (SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY)
Little is known about why humans choose construction of scale models as a leisure activity. There are negative perceptions of modelers, but model-making may be a fitness indicator, signaling creativity and problem-solving ability. Young women were tested to determine whether leisure activity (model-making, cross-stitch, or hiking) influenced the perceived attractiveness of a potential mate. Leisure activity did affect perceived attractiveness (but the hiker was most attractive), which then affected interest in a committed, intimate relationship.

6:00pm - 6:15pm
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS OF GRATITUDE AT THE GROUP LEVEL OF ANALYSIS
PATRICK DWYER (INDIANA UNIVERSITY), SARA ALGOE, AYANA YOUNGE (UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL), CHRISTOPHER OVEIS (UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO)
We propose a novel theoretical and empirical approach to studying group-level social functions of emotions and use it to make new predictions about the social consequences of gratitude. Emotional expressions may coordinate group living by changing 3rd party witnesses’ behavior toward 1st party emotion expressers. Three experiments revealed that witnessing gratitude expressions increases helping from 3rd party witnesses to 1st party expressers, and that the mechanism of other-praising behavior is responsible for these effects.


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6/18/2020

8:00 AM
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Clinical Psychology and Psi Chi Symposium: Graduate School and the Masters Degree Option


Tony  Crespi

 

CHAIR: TONY CRESPI (UNIVERSITY OF HARTFORD)

GRADUATE SCHOOL FOR MASTER’S OR DOCTORAL DEGREES: CHOICES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN A COMPLEX MARKET
M.A. or Ph.D.? Ph.D. Or Psy.D.? Clinical Psychology or Counseling Psychology? School Psychology or Child Clinical Psychology? Forensic Psychology? Marriage and Family Therapy? Full-Time or Part-Time? What employment opportunities exist? Is an MA a good option? Is an MA a good choice enroute to a Ph.D.? For students interested in graduate education the choices are daunting. This presentation examines master’s and doctoral degree options, and employment. The applied nature and interactive discussion should be engaging to participants.

Presentations:
Counseling Psychology To Forensic Psychology: Maximizing Employability In A Competitive Environment
by Tony Crespi (University of Hartford)
School Psychology To Child Clinical Psychology: Inside The Mental Health Crisis
by Natasha Segool (University of Hartford)
Advisors, Mentors, and Supervisors: Reflections On Graduate Education and Training
by Mikayla Alicandro (University of Hartford)


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6/18/2020

8:00 AM
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Teaching of Psychology Symposium: Teaching Critical Thinking in Psychology


D. Alan  Bensley

 

CHAIR: D. ALAN BENSLEY

This symposium provides guidelines and suggestions to psychology instructors on how to teach critical thinking (CT). Four psychology instructors who have written textbooks on CT in psychology present descriptions of evidence-based and best practices in teaching CT, along with practical suggestions for infusing CT into psychology courses. Presentations include how to reduce misconceptions and thinking errors, everyday applications of CT-focused research methods and statistics, and guidelines for incorporating a game-theory approach to promoting CT.

Presentations:
Improving the Recognition of Thinking Errors and Psychological Misconceptions
by D. Alan Bensley (Frostburg State University)
Show Me the Data: Thinking Critically about Research Results
by Bernard Beins (Ithaca College)
Promoting Critical Thinking through Open Science
by Susan Nolan (Seton Hall University)
Game Design Teaches Critical Thinking
by Thomas Heinzen (William Paterson University)

Discussant: Paige H. Fisher (Seton Hall University)


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6/18/2020

8:00 AM
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Applied Papers: Appearance, Perception, and Assessment


Lindsey  LaPlant

 

CHAIR: LINDSEY LAPLANT

8:00am - 8:15am
RBF NOT JUST THE FACE! PERCEPTIONS ABOUT RESTING BITCH FACE BEYOND UNDERGRADUATES
LINDSEY LAPLANT, CHRISTY FESSLER (NAZARETH COLLEGE)
In light of people’s responses to smiling and nonsmiling women, the potential negative impact of the term “Resting Bitch Face” (RBF) on women needs to be addressed. The current study replicated and extended the investigation of people’s perceptions of RBF from our undergraduate sample to the wider community. Both similarities and differences between the community and undergraduate samples emerged for the most common descriptions as well as how those descriptions differentiated ambivalent sexism scores.

8:20am - 8:35am
SEXTING IN LGBT YOUTH

ELIZABETH ENGLANDER, EMILY COTTER, TIM SMITH (BRIDGEWATER STATE UNIVERSITY)
Research on "sexting" (the sending of nude pictures to a peer by an underage youth) has largely focused on risks and poor outcomes among heterosexual youth. The current study, conducted on 1,093 youth in 2017 and 2018, examined sexting behaviors among non-heterosexual youth and compared these with the heterosexual sexters in the sample. Findings and educational methods based on these findings will be presented in this presentation.

8:40am - 8:55am
EFFECT OF DEFENDANT APPEARANCE, BEHAVIOR, AND OFFENSE ON PERCEPTIONS OF CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY
LAUREN MCDOWELL, MATT ZAITCHIK, JUDITH PLATANIA (ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY)
The current study examined factors that contribute to participants’ perceptions of criminal responsibility. A sample of 291 participants participated in a 2 x 2 x 4 between-subjects factorial design varying the defendant’s criminal charge, appearance, and courtroom behavior. Participants rated the defendants’ criminal responsibility and provided a verdict. Results indicated that murder offenses were more likely to result in a NGRI verdict, and defendants exhibiting bizarre behavior during trial were found the least criminally responsible.

9:00am - 9:15am
A PROPOSAL FOR A VERY EARLY DEVELOPMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF AUTISM
PATRICE MILLER (SALEM STATE UNIVERSITY)
In the current presentation, we will discuss a possible new method for assessing children’s behaviors. This assessment is designed to be useful in providing an early indication of behaviors consistent with autism or possibly other developmental disabilities. It contains a wide range of developmentally-ordered items, so that a child’s current level of engaging with tasks can be assessed. This will also allow for more precise interventions.


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6/18/2020

8:00 AM
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Social Psychology Papers IV: Perceptions of Personality


Justin   Bonny

 

CHAIR: WARREN REICH

8:00am - 8:15am
DEVELOPMENT OF COHESION IN NEWLY-FORMED TEAMS SHAPED BY MEMBER PERSONALITY TRAITS
JUSTIN BONNY (MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY)
In organizations, small groups are frequently formed to complete a task. Cohesion, how strongly members are drawn together, is one factor connected to team performance. How do personality traits of newly-formed teams influence the development of cohesion? In the present study, as groups completed a team-based video game, cohesion improved rapidly and was influenced by personality trait variations. This suggests that member personality traits shape the development of cohesion as new teams form.

8:20am - 8:35am
THE PSYCHOMETRIC STRUCTURE OF INTERPERSONAL PERCEPTION: A MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALING ANALYSIS
WARREN REICH (HUNTER COLLEGE CUNY)
Three hundred participants completed the 44-item Big Five Inventory (BFI, John & Srivastava, 1999) to describe self, someone known well - social context, someone known well - academic/work context, acquaintance - social context, and acquaintance - academic/work context. Multidimensional scaling of BFI items revealed that an evaluative dimension (anchored by neuroticism vs. agreeableness items) accounted for more item rating variance in the two acquaintance and known-academic/work than for self or known other-social targets.

8:40am - 8:55am
ROLE CONGRUENCE AND INVOLVEMENT: EXAMINING ROLE-BASED EXPERIENCE THROUGH A MULTIPLE-IDENTITY FRAMEWORK
GILLIAN GLASSER, WARREN REICH (HUNTER COLLEGE, CUNY)
Based on the Reich et al. (2013) study, the current study further investigates the highly correlated relationship between Self-Role Congruence (SRC) and Role Involvement (RI) for a set of 14 roles that are nested within persons, using HLM to remove within persons variations. The hypothesis is that SRC and RI are correlated across roles independent of the influence of a person’s Life Satisfaction (LS). Results show that SRC explained significant variance in RI beyond LS.

9:00am - 9:15am
A PROPOSAL TO MEASURE VALUE OF MATCHES BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS AND PROFESSIONS
SHUTONG WEI (DARE ASSOCIATION)
Professionals in this day and age face issues of job dissatisfaction and burnout. We propose that it may be useful to measure the value of matching the vocational interests and the Order of Hierarchical Complexity of individuals with professions available on the labor market. A behavioral approach to the issues of labor market frictions would be helpful, as behaviors provide crucial insights of individuals that may be unattainable through interviews, resumes, or reference checks.


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6/18/2020

9:30 AM
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STP Harry Kirke Wolfe Lecture: What Can We Learn from Fake News?


Susan  Nolan

 

WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM FAKE NEWS? BUILDING CRITICAL THINKING AND SCIENTIFIC LITERACY IN THE CLASSROOM
SUSAN NOLAN (SETON HALL UNIVERSITY)
CHAIR: JASON SPIEGELMAN

Political “fake news” may get more attention, but science “fake news” is dangerous, too. As psychology instructors, we are perfectly situated to help students develop the critical thinking and scientific literacy skills they need to differentiate among reports of strong (and hopefully reproducible) evidence, stories – often historical – that are ultimately some form of fake news, and reports that are legitimate but get the science wrong in some way. By integrating stories, activities, and assignments throughout the semester, we can help students build the “need for cognition” that drives us to enjoy thinking critically and scientifically.


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6/18/2020

9:30 AM
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Focus Session: History of Psychology at Akron, Ohio


Florence L.  Denmark

 

CHAIR: FLORENCE DENMARK

Many EPA members and students are not aware of or knowledgeable about the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology located in Akron, Ohio. The Center contains the archives of the History of American Psychology as well as the museum. Dr. Cathy Faye, Assistant Director, will give an overview of the Center, its contents and its importance for the History of Psychology. Dr. David Baker, the Director of the Center, will add his comments. Diane Loegel, a Master's student of Psychology and Graduate Assistant of Florence Denmark, will be part of the discussion as well.

Presentations:
HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY AT AKRON, OHIO
by Florence Denmark, Diane Loegel (Pace University), Cathy Faye, David Baker (University of Akron)


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6/18/2020

9:30 AM
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Clinical Psychology: Paper Session III


Ira Randy  Kulman

 

CHAIR: IRA RANDY KULMAN

9:30am - 9:45am
THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SCREENING TOOL TO ASSESS SLOW PROCESSING SPEED

IRA RANDY KULMAN (UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND), CASSANDRA MANDOJANA (UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND)
Slow processing speed (SPS) is increasingly identified in the classroom and community. The pace of 21st-century life, high-stakes testing, and demands of school can cause children with SPS to fall behind. Subtle impacts of SPS include lowered self-esteem, identifying as being lazy, and avoidant behavior. SPS is generally identified through lengthy neuropsychological testing. The development of a screening tool for parents, The Processing Speed Questionnaire, can help with the early identification of SPS.

9:50am - 10:05am
THE ABILITY OF NAïVE PARTICIPANTS TO MALINGER MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

JOSEPH PRECKAJLO, MONIKA FLOWERS, RICHARD CONTI (KEAN UNIVERSITY)
The present study investigated the ability of naïve participants to malinger mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in a civil case involving an automobile accident. After reading the case, participants were asked to simulate mTBI symptoms in order to obtain financial compensation. Participants were either given a standard symptom checklist or a modified checklist containing additional bogus items. Over 50% of participants in both groups were able to successfully malinger mTBI, and 37% endorsed bogus symptoms.

10:10am - 10:25am
PREDICTORS OF MENTAL HEALTH LITERACY IN A DIVERSE SAMPLE OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

RONA MILES, LAURA RABIN, ANJALI KRISHNAN (BROOKLYN COLLEGE OF THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK)
Mental Health Literacy was assessed in a demographically diverse sample of undergraduate students (n=1200) using a newly developed measure. Factors associated with the greatest variance in mental health literacy scores included having taken a class related to clinical psychology, majoring in psychology, being diagnosed or treated for a psychological disorder, gender, and ethnicity. Findings will be used to develop interventions at the college level that target vulnerable students in this high risk population.


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6/18/2020

9:30 AM
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Cognitive Psychology Papers II


Renée   DeCaro

 

CHAIR: ALIA WULFF (TUFTS UNIVERSITY)

9:30am - 9:45am
UPDATING PSYCHOLOGY MISCONCEPTIONS THROUGH SELF-REGULATED LEARNING
RENÉE DECARO, AYANNA K. THOMAS (TUFTS UNIVERSITY)
Students can regulate learning; however, little research has examined self-regulated learning in the context of strongly-held misconceptions. In this study, individuals took a test of common misconceptions related to psychology and selected items for which they wanted to receive more information. Individuals regulated learning (i.e., selected items) after they had initially rated confidence or self-relevance of the psychology-related knowledge. Selections were based on prior ratings and affected whether individuals corrected misconceptions on a follow-up test.

9:50am - 10:05am
WARNING AGAINST MISINFORMATION: AN INVESTIGATION INTO RETRIEVAL ENHANCED SUGGESTIBILITY
ALIA WULFF (TUFTS UNIVERSITY), JESSICA KARANIAN (FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY), ELIZABETH RACE, AYANNA K. THOMAS (TUFTS UNIVERSITY)
Misleading post-event information impairs memory for an original event. This is exacerbated when an initial test is given, an effect termed retrieval enhanced suggestibility (RES). In a series of two experiments, we manipulated warnings and number of tests to further investigate reconsolidation, a proposed mechanism for RES. We found that the original event memory is accessible following initial testing when given a warning, which has implications for our theoretical understanding of the phenomenon.

10:10am - 10:25am
INTERLEAVING PROMOTES LEARNING OF MATH BECAUSE OF SPACING AND NOT DISCRIMINATION
NATHAN FOSTER (THE COLLEGE OF WOOSTER)
Interleaving practice of mathematics problems improves learning compared to blocked practice (Rohrer & Taylor, 2007). We evaluated whether distributed practice or discriminative contrast produces this advantage. Participants solved volume formulas using standard interleaving or remote interleaving in which one formula was interleaved with non-volume math problems. The interleaving advantage was observed for both groups compared to blocked controls. Importantly, the interleaving magnitude was the same for both standard and remote interleaved practice.

10:30am - 10:45am
RETRIEVAL PRACTICE AND CHEMISTRY EDUCATION: THE LIMITS OF A POWERFUL LEARNING TOOL

GREGORY HUGHES, AYANNA THOMAS (TUFTS UNIVERSITY)
Taking practice tests, or retrieval practice, is a powerful way to enhance long-term memory. With cue-target word pairs, retrieval practice in the forward direction (cue-?) benefits performance on later tests in the forward direction (cue-?) and backward direction (?-target). We extended this research by using verbal-visual pairs (names of molecules - pictorial diagrams of their structures). Contradicting prior work, retrieval practice only benefited memory on tests in the forward, but not backward, direction.


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6/18/2020

9:30 AM
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10:51 AM


   
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Community Psychology: Workshop III


Chidera  Emeto

 

DEVELOPING A SENSE OF COMMUNITY AMONG INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
CHIDERA EMETO, MARYAM SODEYI, OLUFUNKE BENSON (UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN)

The transition into a new environment with a different culture can be very stressful and demanding for international students. A student can easily feel out of place and lonely without social support and the right resources available. The aim of this workshop is to discuss how to develop a sense of community among international students using the African Graduate Students Association (AGSA) at the University of New Haven as a case study.


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6/18/2020

9:30 AM
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Social Psychology Papers V: Social Issues


Hailey  Holt

 

CHAIR: HAILEY HOLT

9:30am - 9:45am
UNDERSTANDING THE CONNECTION BETWEEN MORAL COURAGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
HAILEY L HOLT, HUI YU, FANLI JIA (SETON HALL UNIVERSITY)
In the present study, we examined the relationship between moral courage and environmentalism in a community sample. We found individuals scored higher in environmental identity and environmental involvement when they showed moral courage (feeling conflict and frustration about the consequence toward environmental issues) than individuals who did not show a sign of moral courage. The study suggests that fostering moral courage that is associated with environmental issues appears to be effective and promising.

9:50am - 10:05am
URBAN AND SUBURBAN: IMMIGRATION AND SYSTEM JUSTIFICATION
DAVID CAICEDO (CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK), VIVIENNE BADAAN (NEW YORK UNIVERSITY)
This study examined the influence of immigration-related social labels and political ideology on attitudes towards unauthorized immigrants/immigration. Participants from two community colleges in New York and New Jersey (n= 744) were randomly assigned to a social label condition (exposure to “illegal” or “undocumented”, embedded within an attitude scale), followed by the General System Justification scale. Results demonstrated that whereas social labels did not have a significant influence on attitudes, college community and political ideology did.

10:10am - 10:25am
ATTITUDINAL PREDICTORS IN THE CONTEXT OF RACIAL PROFILING
SAMANTHA SUTTON, SARAH TRIFARI, LAUREN MCDOWELL, JUDITH PLATANIA (ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY)
In the current study we investigate individual difference factors that may explain attitudes towards racial profiling in a civil context. A series of individual difference measures were administered to a sample of community members in order to determine their predictive ability in the context of racial profiling. Legal cynicism, everyday discrimination, attributional complexity, and racism emerged as significant predictors of a context-specific racial incident. Our findings suggest the need to explore how these factors function.

10:30am - 10:45am
REDUCING AGEISM BY FACILITATING INTERGENERATIONAL CONTACT AND PROVIDING AGING EDUCATION: AN EMPIRICAL TEST OF THE PEACE MODEL
ASHLEY LYTLE (STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY)
Utilizing the PEACE (Positive Education about Aging and Contact Experiences) model as a theoretical foundation, Instapals was a novel pilot ageism reduction intervention that: 1) provided aging education to undergraduate students in a non-gerontology course and 2) facilitated intergenerational contact. Over the course of a semester, participants reported a significant decrease in aging anxiety, psychological concerns about aging, and negative stereotyping of older adults.


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6/18/2020

9:30 AM
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10:59 AM


   
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Developmental Invited Symposium: Cutting Edge Methods


Nicholas   Wagner

 

CHAIR: KIMBERLY CUEVAS (UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT)

125 YEARS OF ADVANCING DEVELOPMENTAL SCIENCE: CUTTING EDGE METHODS
This symposium addresses historical changes in developmental science with a focus on how recent methodological advances allow us to peer into development in new ways. This series of presentations incorporate diverse developmental science frameworks to explore how multiple levels of influence in early life contribute to long-term outcomes. Presenters will discuss their findings on a variety of topics with human and non-human populations: early lexical development, callous-unemotional traits and conduct problems, and adversity and interventions.

Presentations:
Leveraging a Developmental Science Approach to Examine the Processes and Mechanisms Associated with Early Externalizing Psychopathology
by Nicholas Wagner (Boston University)
More than Words: The Visual Ecology of Toddlers’ Language Learning Environment
by Umay Suanda (University of Connecticut)
Epigenetic Consequences of Developmental Adversity and Intervention
by Tania Roth (University of Delaware)

Discussant: Kimberly Cuevas (University of Connecticut)


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6/18/2020

11:00 AM
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Applied Keynote Speaker: Jane Halonen


Jane  Halonen

 

POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY AS HIGH IMPACT PRACTICE
JANE S. HALONEN (UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA)
CHAIR: JENNIFER LW THOMPSON

Positive Psychology provides a unique vehicle for the development of undergraduate goals, including content mastery, critical thinking, and debunking myths. Course assignments promote teamwork and presentation skills, creativity, and a vision for the future. I provide hints on how to make course experiences meaningful, memorable, and efficiently delivered even in large classes.


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6/18/2020

11:00 AM
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Clinical Psychology: Paper Session IV


Alejandro  Leguizamo

 

CHAIR: ALEJANDRO LEGUIZAMO

11:00am - 11:15am
PREDICTORS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING AMONG LATINXS: AN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS APPROACH
ALEJANDRO LEGUIZAMO, MACKENZIE RAMSAY, IRENE SANCHEZ (ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY)
While psychological well-being has been studied with respected to diverse samples, research has tended to focus on individual variables. Utilizing Bronfenbrenner's (1977) Ecological Systems Model, we explored predictors of psychological well-being for a Latinx community sample. Our findings supported the use of the Ecological Model and of the importance of including community and societal variables in this line of research.

11:20am - 11:35am
ADULTS WITH AUTISM DISCUSS THEIR EXPERIENCE OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING
CATHERINE CALDWELL-HARRIS, TIFFANY MCGLOWAN, MEGHAN GARRITY, SHIRUI CHEN (BOSTON UNIVERSITY)
Little is known about how persons with autism spectrum conditions acquire foreign languages. To augment the literature with the experiences of autistic persons, trained raters coded forum posts for categories such as method of learning, number of languages, and outcomes of learnings. Relative to posters writing on non-ASC websites, those with autism reported being being self-taught, being a polyglot, having a special interest in learning language.

11:40am - 11:55am
PSYCHOSOCIAL MEDIATORS AND MODERATORS OF THE GENDER DIFFERENCE IN ELDER DEPRESSION
KAITE YANG, CHRISTINE FERRI (STOCKTON UNIVERSITY), JOAN GIRGUS (PRINCETON UNIVERSITY)
It is unclear which psychosocial factors predict the gender difference in depression in older adults (Girgus, Yang & Ferri, 2017). Baseline ORANJ BOWL panel data from 3008 participants (>59) revealed that women had significantly more negative mood and depressive symptoms, lower life satisfaction, functional ability, physical health, financial comfort, and income, but more social support than men (p’s<.02). Significant moderation and mediation effects by psychosocial predictors were found for depression, negative mood, and life satisfaction.


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6/18/2020

11:00 AM
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Learning Focused Papers Session: Operant Approaches to Addiction


Gene  Heyman

 

CHAIR: DAVID KEARNS

OPERANT APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF ADDICTION
The talks in this focused papers session illustrate the ways that operant theory and research has been applied to the study of drug addiction.

Presentations:
What the Matching Law Has Taught Us about Addiction (and Choice)
by Gene Heyman (Boston College)
Heroin Choice Depends on Income Level and Economy Type
by David Kearns (American University)


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6/18/2020

11:00 AM
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Teaching of Psychology Papers: Issues of Academic Performance


Maysa  DeSousa

 

CHAIR: JASON SPIEGELMAN

11:00am - 11:15am
THE EFFECT OF THE "MIDTERM PERIOD" ON STRESS, ANXIETY AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE
MAYSA DESOUSA (SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE)
In order to assess how unofficial midterm periods impact heath and academic performance in college students, the current study aimed to: 1) identify whether students do have a significantly greater workload during a two-week period in the middle of the semester (midterm), and 2) discover whether this two-week period was associated with more perceived stress, more anxiety, and lower test scores. Findings support the existence of increased workload and increased perceived stress during this period.

11:20am - 11:35am
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERSONALITY TYPE AND PREFERRED TEACHING METHODS FOR UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGE STUDENTS
LAURIE MURPHY, NINA EDULJEE, KAREN CROTEAU, SUZANNE PARKMAN (SAINT JOSEPH'S COLLEGE OF MAINE)
This study examined the relationship between Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) personality types and preferred teaching methods for 507 undergraduate students. Across all MBTI dichotomies, students indicated a preference for teaching methods that involved lecturer-student interaction, using visual tools such as PowerPoint, and demonstrations and practice. Significant differences were obtained between the MBTI dichotomies and preferred teaching methods. The results demonstrate the importance of faculty tailoring their instruction to accommodate the needs of their students.


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6/18/2020

11:00 AM
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Psi Chi Workshop: Finding Fit


Garth A.  Fowler

 

CHAIR: MARY JENSON

FINDING FIT: A STRATEGIC APPROACH TO APPLYING TO GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN PSYCHOLOGY
GARTH A FOWLER (AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION)
SUSAN WHITBOURNE (UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS BOSTON)

This presentation helps prepare students to be strategic and thoughtful when applying to graduate training programs in psychology. We will describe the different degree options available to applicants and provide advice on writing personal statements, requesting letters of recommendation, preparing for interviews and more!


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6/18/2020

11:00 AM
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12:21 PM


   
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Social Psychology Papers VI: The Social Self


Michael  Kitchens

 

CHAIR: MICHAEL KITCHENS

11:00am - 11:15am
BELIEFS ABOUT GOD ARE AT THE HEART OF THE SELF

MICHAEL KITCHENS, ELIZABETH BARTO, BENJAMIN HOFFMAN (LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE)
Are religious beliefs important to identity? We investigated this question by adapting a paradigm from previous research, showing that central features of identity have more connections with other features of the self. Our results showed that people (N = 60; 21% atheist/agnostic) identified more and stronger connections between their religious beliefs about god(s) and their self-reported, important features of identity than the connections between their religious beliefs and relatively peripheral features of their identity.

11:20am - 11:35am
STEREOTYPE THREAT, ACADEMIC RISK, AND RETENTION AMONG LATINOS
KEVIN RODRIGUEZ, MARISA MEALY, JOSÉ CARLOS DEL AMA, ALEXIS MAYI (CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY)
Latinos who entered a 4-year university full-time in 2010 have a graduation rate of only 54% (de Brey et al., 2019). Path analyses from this study indicate that Latinos with a higher perception of negative stereotypes from others and lower school attitudes are more likely to be at academic risk. Higher academic risk and lower socioeconomic status predict the likelihood of a student considering dropping out. The implications of these findings will be discussed.

11:40am - 11:55am
YOUR GROUP HATES MY GROUP, BUT MY GROUP ONLY DOES NICE THINGS
BRANDON STEWART (UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE)
When explaining motivations for conflict by one’s own group, people will often say that conflict with another group is due to our group having empathy for our ingroup. However, for motivations of the other group, we will say that the other group creates conflict with our group because the other group hates our group. We sought to create a model that identifies threat factors that exacerbate and reduce this Motive Bias and to offer solutions.

12:00pm - 12:15pm
NONTRADITIONAL AND FIRST-GENERATION COLLEGE GRADUATES: HELP SEEKING AND COLLEGE ADJUSTMENT
JANET CHANG, KRISTEN OHL, DANIEL PURNELL, ERIN WALSH, RAYANN NICEWONGER, DUNYA MARKOVIC (WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA)
Research on social-class culture and the help-seeking experiences of nontraditional and first-generation college students/graduates is limited. A family case study was conducted, involving three White adult siblings who are nontraditional and first-generation college graduates. The age when they attended college influenced their college adjustment. They emphasized the importance of social reputation, self-reliance, and relational concerns that inhibited disclosure. They sought help for academic problems from others who were in comparable situations or similar to them.


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6/18/2020

12:30 PM
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History of Psychology & EPA Presidential Invited Keynote: Alexandra Rutherford


Alexandra  Rutherford

 

PSYCHOLOGY AND SUFFRAGE: GENDER, RACE, SCIENCE, AND DEMOCRACY AT THE TURN OF THE 20TH CENTURY
ALEXANDRA RUTHERFORD (YORK UNIVERSITY)
CHAIR: AMY LEARMONTH

In 2020, we mark not only the 125th anniversary of EPA, but the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment which gave women the right to vote in the United States. The 1920 ratification was preceded by several decades of activism by women and abolitionists, with the historic Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 often cited as the beginning of the movement. Thus, the first decades of EPA, and indeed the first decades of scientific psychology, coincided with the long march towards suffrage. This movement was beset by internal contradictions and the often frankly eugenicist ideology that permeated American society and psychology during this time. In this talk I provide a glimpse into the ways psychologists' writings on race and gender reinforced arguments both for and against universal suffrage at the same time that some individual psychologists worked diligently for women's rights both inside and outside the discipline. In revisiting this history, we are prompted to consider how gender, race, class, immigration status, and their intersections continue to privilege some, and deny others, access to citizenship and equal representation under the law.


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6/18/2020

2:00 PM
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Social Psychology Keynote: Wind Goodfriend


Wind  Goodfriend

 

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY & POPULAR CULTURE: LOVE INTHE MOVIES
WIND GOODFRIEND (BUENA VISTA UNIVERSITY)
CHAIR: TOM HEINZEN

Social psychology can be seen everywhere, including in popular movies. How can instructors use movies to excite students about classroom material? Four examples of movies and social psychological theories are discussed in this talk, as well as specific ideas for class discussions, activities, and assignments. Specific concepts discussed include cross-cultural differences in marriage, attachment theory, misattribution of arousal, and relationship violence. While these examples all focus on love and attraction, the ideas can be generalized to any subarea of psychology.



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6/18/2020

2:00 PM
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History of Psychology Papers


Suzanne C.   Baker

 

CHAIR: DARRYL HILL

2:00pm - 2:15pm
INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY: MORE HISTORY THAN OTHER SCIENCES?
SUZANNE C. BAKER (JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY), DANA S. DUNN (MORAVIAN COLLEGE)
How much history-related content is taught in introductory psychology? What are the pros and cons of including historical background in introductory psychology? We examined a sample of introductory textbooks from Psychology, Biology, and Chemistry in order to compare the prevalence of history-related content. Across disciplines, psychology texts included more history-related content. Potential pros of this approach include situating psychological findings in a cultural context. Cons include an overemphasis on content that is not representative

2:20pm - 2:35pm
ARCHIVAL PSYCHOLOGY, HISTORICAL ERRORS, AND THE DIGITAL AGE
DARRYL HILL (COLLEGE OF STATEN ISLAND, CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK)
Students of the history of psychology often find historical misconceptions and corrections the most compelling narratives in psychology history classes. Yet astute students ask: how did historians get it so wrong? What is the reason for all these historical mistakes? This presentation seeks to remind students and practitioners of archival history about the nature of historical mistakes, how they are to be avoided, and in particular, the challenges historical archivists face in the digital age.


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6/18/2020

2:00 PM
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Learning Papers II: Cues, Contingencies, and Surprise


Noelle  Michaud

 

CHAIR: DAVID KEARNS

2:00pm - 2:15pm
STIMULUS SALIENCE AND REINFORCER PREDICTABILITY IN THE FORMATION OF HABITS
NOELLE MICHAUD, ERIC THRAILKILL, MARK BOUTON (UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT)
Previous research suggests (1) that the “salience” of a discriminative stimulus may influence a response’s insensitivity to reinforcer devaluation and therefore promote habitual behavior, and (2) that habit develops mainly when the stimulus predicts that the behavior will be reinforced with a 100%, rather than 50%, certainty. Five experiments examined these ideas. The results confirm that reinforcer predictability affects habit formation and that salience of the stimulus might also have a role.

2:20pm - 2:35pm
RETURNING HABIT BACK TO GOAL-DIRECTED ACTION WITH SURPRISING REINFORCERS
MATTHEW BROOMER, MARK BOUTON (UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT)
Habits are considered inflexible and perhaps permanent. Here, however, we demonstrate that unexpected presentation of a food reinforcer before test can return a habit to goal-directed action. Following extended instrumental training, rats underwent outcome devaluation (the reinforcer was paired or unpaired with LiCl). Then, before testing the instrumental response in extinction, half received a 30-minute exposure to a non-averted reinforcer. At test, pre-fed animals exhibited sensitivity to outcome devaluation (action), whereas controls exhibited insensitivity (habit).

2:40pm - 2:55pm
PLAYING OFF NUMBER OF TRIALS AGAINST DURATION OF TRIALS IN CONTINGENCY
DORIANN MARIE ALCAIDE AMADOR (BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY), SANTIAGO CASTIELLO DE OBESO (UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD), JIM WITNAUER (STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK- THE COLLEGE AT BROCKPORT), AUDREY LI, ANDREW COOK (BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY), ROBIN MURPHY (UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD), RALPH MILLER (BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY)
In contingency learning, do trials on which the cue and outcome are both absent (D events) function as intertrial intervals to enhance learning? We assessed the influence of duration and number of D events on contingency judgments. Using human subjects, we found that the effect of number of D events is far greater than that of duration of D events. Thus, signaling more D events, even when event durations are inversely shorter, yields better performance.

3:00pm - 3:15pm
THE EFFECT OF CUE PRE-EXPOSURE SURVIVES CONDITIONING IN A MULTI-OUTCOME VIDEO-GAME TASK.
MANUEL ARANZUBIA, JAMES NELSON, MARIA DEL CARMEN SANJUAN (UNIVERSITY OF THE BASQUE COUNTRY [UPV/EHU]), JEFFREY LAMOUREUX (BOSTON COLLEGE)
In E1, R-O1 conditioning was conducted to asymptote in a video game followed by R-O1O2 conditioning. O2 was an added simultaneous outcome to which participants could independently respond. Conditioning with O1 delayed conditioning with O2(negative transfer). Pre-exposure to R retarded conditioning to both O1, and O2. Experiment 2 showed that R-O1 training did not make R inhibitory for O2. Implications for theories of latent inhibition are discussed.


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6/18/2020

2:00 PM
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Teaching of Psychology Symposium: Challenging Tasks in General Psychology at the US Military Academy


Aryn  Pyke

 

CHAIR: ELIZABETH WETZLER

PROVIDING DELIBERATELY CHALLENGING TASKS IN A GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR LEADERS COURSE AT THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY
Instructors at West Point pair challenging tasks with supportive instruction to facilitate learning. In General Psychology for Leaders, instructors presented memory lesson materials in a difficult-to-read font designed to promote deep processing, required daily study quizzes online or in-class for repeated and distributed self-testing practice, and used artificial intelligence for individualized oral presentation feedback. Evaluations and applications of these activities will be presented, along with a discussion of how well course grades predict subsequent leadership performance.

Presentations:
Sans Forgetica and Self-Testing: Combining Desirable Difficulties for a Lesson on Memory

by Aryn Pyke, Adam Werner, David Feltner (United States Military Academy)
Using Online versus In-Class Daily Study Quizzes in General Psychology for Leaders
by Elizabeth Wetzler, John Morrow, Evelyn Anne Mocek (United States Military Academy)
Incorporating Quantified Communications into West Point’s General Psychology for Leaders
by John Dibble, Tara Middlebrooks (United States Military Academy)
Predicting Leadership Performance from General Psychology for Leaders Grades: A Longitudinal Assessment
by Andrew Hagemaster, Steven Condly (United States Military Academy), Angela Yarnell (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences), Benjamin Adams (United States Military Academy)

Discussant: Tara Middlebrooks (United States Military Academy)


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6/18/2020

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Psi Chi and Cognitive Keynote: Steven Pinker


Steven  Pinker

 

THE ELEPHANT, THE EMPEROR, AND THE MATZO BALL: COMMON KNOWLEDGE AS A RATIFIER OF HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
STEVEN PINKER (HARVARD UNIVERSITY)
CHAIR: SHAUN COOK

Why do we veil our intentions in innuendo rather than blurting them out? Why do we blush and weep? Why do we express outrage at public violations of decorum? Why are dictators so threatened by free speech and public protests? Why don’t bystanders pitch in to help? I suggest that these phenomena may be explained by the logical distinction between shared knowledge (A knows x and B knows x) and common knowledge (A knows x, B knows x, A knows that B knows x, B knows that A knows x, ad infinitum). Game theory specifies that common knowledge is necessary for coordination, in which two or more agents can cooperate for mutual benefit. I propose represent common knowledge as a distinct cognitive category that licenses them to coordinate with others according to the rules of one of several distinct relationship types. Many puzzles of social life, such as hypocrisy, taboo, outrage, tact, and embarrassment arise from people’s desire to generate—or to avoid generating—common knowledge.


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6/18/2020

2:00 PM
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3:20 PM


   
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Behavioral Neuroscience Papers II: Genetic, Translational, and Neural Network Approaches


Max   Levine

 

CHAIR: TRAVIS TODD

2:00pm - 2:15pm
ANTICIPATORY NAUSEA IN CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY: PREDICTING AND UNDERSTANDING ITS INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY
MAX LEVINE (SIENA COLLEGE), KRISTINA PUZINO (PENN STATE UNIVERSITY), KENNETH KOCH (WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY)
Cancer patients’ anticipatory nausea prior to chemotherapy was significantly correlated with both acute and delayed nausea experienced during and after patients’ initial session. These results are consistent with a classical conditioning model of anticipatory nausea. Sex, age, and ethnicity also appeared to be important factors. An improved ability to identify patients at risk for anticipatory nausea is hoped to facilitate the development of effective interventions.

2:20pm - 2:35pm
RESCUING INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION OF ABERRANT DNA METHYLATION ASSOCIATED WITH EARLY LIFE MALTREATMENT
NICHOLAS COLLINS, CATHERINE ZIMMERMAN, TIFFANY DOHERTY, TANIA ROTH (UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE)
Early life adversity can increase the propensity for future aberrant maternal behavior through epigenomic modification. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi’s) have been shown to rescue aberrant DNA methylation and behavioral phenotypes in animal models. We investigated if an HDACi can normalize aberrant DNA methylation associated with maltreatment. A dose sufficiently lowered methylation in the female PFC. Ongoing work is determining if this dose is sufficient in rescuing aberrant caregiving behavior and the epigenome of the progeny.

2:40pm - 2:55pm
TRANSGENERATIONAL EFFECTS OF PATERNAL ALCOHOL EXPOSURE
JENNIFER KOABEL, MICHAEL NIZHNIKOV (SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY)
Research suggests that addictive traits are heritable, but very few studies have been performed to explore transgenerational effects of paternal alcohol exposure. We exposed male rats to binge doses of alcohol or water and mated them with untreated females. We bred their offspring to test the second generation’s ethanol intake and behavioral differences in light/dark box and elevated plus maze. The results show that differences do indeed exhibit themselves in subsequent generations.

3:00pm - 3:15pm
ADAPTIVE NEURAL NETWORKS ACCOUNTED FOR BY FIVE INSTANCES OF “RESPONDENT-BASED” CONDITIONING
MICHAEL COMMONS (HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL), PATRICE MILLER (SALEM STATE UNIVERSITY), SIMRAN MAHOLTRA, SHUTONG WEI (DARE ASSOCIATION)
Neural networks may be made faster and more efficient by reducing the amount of memory and computation used. In this paper, a new type of neural network, called an Adaptive Neural Network, is introduced. The proposed neural network is comprised of 5 unique pairings of events. The use of these simple respondent pairings as a basis for neural networks reduces errors. Examples of problems that may be addressable by such networks are included.


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6/18/2020

2:00 PM
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Developmental Papers: Schooling & Parents


Sarah  Stanger

 

CHAIR: SARAH STANGER (ALLEGHENY COLLEGE)

2:00pm - 2:15pm
COPING IS A TEAM SPORT: PARENT-CHILD FLEXIBILITY AND PARENT SOCIALIZATION OF COPING
SARAH STANGER (ALLEGHENY COLLEGE), JAMIE ABAIED, MEGHAN MORRISON (UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT)
This study applied state space grids, a contemporary dynamic systems methodology, to examine whether parent-child flexibility moderates the impact of particular parent socialization of coping practices during a stressful parent-child laboratory task on later child adjustment. Results suggest that in the context of parents who provide limited in-the-moment directive suggestions about how to cope with a stressor, children demonstrated better adjustment if there was greater flexibility in parent and child task behavior.

2:20pm - 2:35pm
PARENT BEHAVIOR AT YOUTH SOCCER: RELATIONS BETWEEN PARENT COMMENTS AND PLAYER PERCEPTIONS
MARIA BARTINI, MEG RICHARDSON, RANDI ROCCA, ALYSSA KEEGAN, ASHLEY WILSON (MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS)
Through both self-reported survey data and naturalistic observation, we found that parents are generally positive in their behavior at youth sporting events. Surveys from the youth athletes themselves also agree that parents and coaches are much more positive than negative. However, youth soccer players’ enjoyment of the game and likelihood of playing in the future were more strongly predicted by their own perceptions of their competence than by perceptions of adult behavior.


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6/18/2020

3:30 PM
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4:50 PM


   
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EPA Presidential Address: Amy Learmonth


Amy  Learmonth

 

TRAINING THE FUTURE OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE: BRINGING UNDERGRADUATES INTO DEVELOPMENTAL RESEARCH
AMY LEARMONTH (WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY)
CHAIR: KIMBERLY CUEVAS

Undergraduate students gain experience in research labs that prepares them for more than graduate school. This talk will focus on ways to give undergraduates, whose time in a research lab is quite short, meaningful experience that also advances a research agenda involving studies that take years. Using research from several labs, I will examine multiple strategies for integrating undergraduates into ongoing developmental research in ways that are both useful to the research and the students.


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6/18/2020

5:00 PM
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6:21 PM


   
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Richard L. Solomon Distinguished Lecture: Edward Wasserman


Edward  Wasserman

 

PRECRASTINATION, ANTICIPATION, AND SIGNALIZATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR ADAPTIVE ACTION
EDWARD WASSERMAN (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA)
CHAIR: DAVE KEARNS

Procrastination is a familiar and widely discussed proclivity: postponing tasks that can be done earlier. Precrastination is a lesser known and explored tendency: completing tasks quickly just to get them done sooner. Recent research suggests that precrastination may represent an important penchant that can be observed in both people and animals. My lecture reviews evidence concerned with precrastination and connects that evidence with a long history of interest in anticipatory learning, distance reception, and brain evolution. Discussion unfolds to encompass several related topics including impulsivity, planning, and self-control. Precrastination may be a new term in the psychological lexicon, but it may be a predisposition with an extended evolutionary history. Placing precrastination within the general rubric of anticipatory action may yield important insights into both adaptive and maladaptive behavior.

J. Bruce Overmier (University of Minnesota) was intially scheduled to deliver this named lecture but was unable to attend due to the COVID-altered universe. Bruce has generously provided EPA with the lecture slides he would have presented; they are available in this session as a bonus handout.


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6/18/2020

5:00 PM
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Invited Symposium: Welcome to the SPARK Society


Ayanna  Thomas

 

CHAIR: AYANNA THOMAS (TUFTS UNIVERSITY)

The aims of the SPARK Society are to increase the representation of people of African, Latinx, and Native American heritage in cognitive psychology, to educate the broader community about attracting and retaining underrepresented minority scholars in cognitive psychology, and to mentor members of these communities at all stages of their careers. This inaugural meeting of the SPARK Society will feature a panel on navigating academia as a scholar from an underrepresented minority group.

Potential Panelists:
Jean E. Fox Tree - University of California Santa Cruz
Alejandro Lleras - University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Ayanna Thomas - Tufts University
Duane Watson - Vanderbilt University


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Trends in the Number of Qualitative Studies in Psychology, Biology, and Social Work since 1900
Debra Hull and John Hull
Bethany College, WV
 
Researchers in psychology, biology, and social work have developed guidelines for assessing quantitative research studies in response to the growing popularity of this methodology. Our analysis of the proportion of qualitative research articles published in peer-reviewed, scholarly journals showed a significant increase over time in all three disciplines, and no differences among disciplines. Overall, the proportion of qualitative studies is small but growing, leading to calls for research courses to train students to qualitative methodologies.




 













Department of Psychology, Seton Hall University



















Sponsor Description









































































 














































































































Social Memory Processes in Older Adults

MIKAELA NEWMAN, LEAMARIE GORDON (ASSUMPTION COLLEGE)

This study explored how cross-group interactions influence eyewitness memory. Older adult participants studied household scenes and then collaborated with an implied partner during a memory task, where the partner recalled incorrect items. Partners were young adults, the same race as participants (same-group interaction) or a different race (cross-group interaction), introduced to participants via photographs and biographies. We found that on a later memory test, participants were more likely to incorporate false suggestions from same-race partners.
















































































































 

 














































 
 











































































































































Keena Singletary is a recent Elizabethtown College graduate who just completed her Bachelor's Degree in Psychology. Her research is based on her undergraduate honors thesis regarding the impact of stress eating on college student populations. Singletary plans to continue and refine her research interests at the University of Akron's Counseling Psychology PhD program this summer.




























 


























 






















Personal factors protecting against psychological distress  (PD) and the effects of a single mindfulness-based intervention (SMMIs) have not been fully explored. The current study helped to shed more light on the processes associated with PD, sympathetic-vagal balance (SVB), and the SMMI. Findings indicated that higher attention abilities were related to lower baseline PD. Greater mindfulness was associated with a higher level of baseline SVB. Baseline SVB was inversely related to stress following the SMMI. 











































































































































SEARCH TASK LEARNING NOT EVIDENT DURING LEARNING TRIALS INFLUENCES BEHAVIOR AT TEST
 
AMY LEARMONTH, SHAZNA ALI, KIRSTEN FERNANDEZ, JULIENN GUZMAN, VICTORIA HANKS, TATIANA CHARLES, IRENA CURANOVIC, CHRISTINA LAGOMARSINO (WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY)
 
Preschool children were presented with a computer screen search task. On half of the learning trials the geometry of the shape indicated where to look for the target and on the other half a star at the edge of the screen provided the cue. In contrast to previous results, the children learned to use the landmark, but not the geometry, however, in test trials the geometric response was preferred by three, four, and five-year-olds.



























































































I am a Clincal Psychology major at Marywood University in Scranton, PA. I also have a minor in English Writing. I am the president of the Marywood chapter of Psi Chi, and a member of the psychology club. I intend to pursue a clinical doctorate and become a therapist.



































































Complexification of Primary Reinforcers: 
The Three Reasons Behaviors are Repeated


William Joseph Harrigan (Harvard University)

For this theory paper, it is posited that the three primary reinforcers of feeding, reproduction, and harm avoidance define the response strength for all behavior. The results of these reinforcers expand into three drive groupings. These contain behaviors related Maintenance, Novelty Sensitivity, and Risk Management, respectively. This process is understood using the Model of Hierarchical Complexity to examine the behaviors that show this complexification. Potential neurotransmitter, and person-environment models that correspond to these groupings are discussed. A lattice displaying the rewards in each hypothesized grouping at several orders if hierarchical complexity will be presented.










 




























































































































PUNISHMENT VERSUS REHABILITATION

RACHEL BONANNO, ROSS KRAWCZYK (THE COLLEGE OF
SAINT ROSE)

The incarceration system attempts to prevent crime through two mechanisms, rehabilitation and punishment. Past research has yet to identify factors to successfully implement these mechanisms. In this study, participants filled out two questionnaires one measuring their religious affiliation and one measuring their perspective on rehabilitation and punishment. Christians had a closer mean with agnostics, whereas atheists had a closer mean to the "other" category. This is important for future reform of the incarceration system.








































































































 










 













STRANGER DANGER: THE EFFECTS OF RACE, SITUATION AND TATTOOS


SHANIYAH WILLIAMS, NATHAIR SPENCER, KRISTIN CISTULLI (SAINT JOSEPH COLLEGE / UNIVERSITY OF SAINT JOSEPH)

The purpose of this study was to investigate how situation, target race, and target tattoo status affect participants perceptions of and comfort with strangers. Participants were randomly assigned to read a scenario in which they were alone or with others, to view one of four accompanying target images, and answer questions about the target. Results suggested that situation, target race, and target tattoo status did not affect participant comfort or perceptions.

 

 

 
































































































































 








 
 




























 



 
 
 










The agonistic continuum (AC) is a dimensional construct indicating preference for collaborative versus coercive or even sadistic sexual interactions. This study assessed the AC in an online survey administered to participants from predominantly Hispanic or non-Hispanic cultural backgrounds. Patterns of correlation between the AC and constructs known to covary with sexual aggression were modeled in both groups. The AC shows promise for studying sexual aggressiveness in broad populations, though multicultural predictiveness is not necessarily equivalent.






















 














































My name is Hallie Dezio and I am going to be a senior in the psychology program at D'Youville College. I have a passion for reading and conducting research and I plan on doing a research based internship in the fall. My future plan is to attend Roberts Wesleyan College and earn my doctorate in clinical and school psychology. 









































































 

 



















 





































































 










I am a graduate from Susquehannna University, with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and a minor in Personal Organization & Communication. In life, I aspire to be an insightful ear / guidance to others. One of my passions include hwlping young people understand and cope with their mental health. 

















































Tatiana Piñeiro, B.S. - Mercy College

Tatiana graduated from Mercy College in the spring of 2020 - Summa Cum Laude, with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology. She will be continuing her scholarly pursuits in the Fall of 2020, while enrolled in a Masters in Mental Health Counseling Program. She is a first-generation, HEOP student. In her time as a student at Mercy College she was on the Dean's list consistently and was inducted as a member of the Psi Chi International Honor Society in Psychology. She was a proud member of the Team STEM program, where she worked as a Peer Mentor and Peer Leader in Statistics, and had the opportunity to also work as a Research Assistant on a number of projects alongside several Mercy College Faculty with focuses on epistemology and achievement and happiness of LGBT+, Latinx youth and emerging adults. She has had the opportunity to present these projects at several conferences in the past year. She has also gained some experience while providing ABA Therapy to children with Autism. She also worked as a Teaching Assistant for Undergraduate Experimental Psychology. She hopes to become a Licensed Psychologist and to continue to work on different mental health research initiatives and to make significant strides in informing policy and making a difference.



Dimitra Tzanis, M.S. - Mercy College 

Dimitra graduated from Mercy College with a Masters of Science in Psychology with a stellar 4.0 GPA. She will be continuing her education in Fall 2021, where she will obtain a PhD in Clinical Neuropsychology. She has worked as a Behavioral Therapist where she aided children with autism and other special needs; to meet their goals using proven ABA methods for the past year and a half. Currently she is working as a Medical Scribe at White Plains Hospital - Cancer Center. She will also start teaching undergrad classes at Mercy College in Fall 2020. Dimitra has been a research assistant for the past four years in multiple projects including focuses on Epistemic Thinking, Mentalization, and Emerging Adulthood. Even through the current pandemic she has stayed determined and persistent as her research and work has gone on. Her ultimate goal is to work in a hospital as a Clinical Neuropsychologist where she will continue her research and see clients. 
 








































The American Psychological Association

The American Psychological Association is the leading scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States, with more than 121,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students as our members.

 
APA delivers exclusive content, products, services and experiences needed to succeed in psychology while promoting the advancement, communication and application of psychological science and knowledge to benefit society and improve lives.

Learn how APA’s collection of tools, resources and information can help advance your development, support your career, grow your network and enhance your expertise.  







Central Connecticut State University's MA Program in Psychology.  










The PCOM School of Professional and Applied Psychology offers cutting-edge, innovative, competency-based graduate programs designed to train competent practitioners and scholars in the fields of clinical psychology, school psychology, counseling and organizational development and leadership.













A national leader in forensic psychology education, Roger Williams University is a small, private, non-profit university located in Bristol, Rhode Island, U.S.A., less than 20 miles from Providence and 70 miles from Boston. The University offers a competitive, pre-doctoral M.A. in Forensic & Legal Psychology, providing students strong research pathways to prepare for Ph.D. programs, and a 60-credit M.A. in Forensic Mental Health Counseling program for students seeking to be licensed clinicians. Over more than 10 years, the University has placed dozens of psychology graduates in clinical employment settings as well as highly competitive doctoral programs across the U.S. and abroad. For 2017, an extensive new scholarship and assistantship program were added to support students in each program, providing financial support and paid research opportunities for competitive candidates.



















The University of La Verne is a private not-for-profit university located in La Verne, California, United States, about 35 miles east of Los Angeles.

University of La Verne is dedicated to the belief that a quality, values-based education enriches the human condition by engendering community engagement, scholarly accomplishment, and professionalism. Along with encouraging diversity, the university focuses on the individual as evidenced in its student/faculty ratio of 15:1. Professors are personally engaged and committed to helping students achieve their academic and professional goals.