NVivo Virtual Conference 2020
September 23, 2020 – 24 hours
Global starting times: 
7:00 am EDT  Boston
12 noon BST London
9:00pm AEST Melbourne


Registration Rate:  $99 USD –  Join the NVivo Community for a special rate of $79 USD

Join Global Research Leaders in Examining Impacts & Trends in Qualitative Research
Although medical scientists have been warning for years that a pandemic was an inevitable, COVID-19 has turned our world upside down. While medical professionals and politicians are focusing on ways to manage this crisis and scientists are trying to develop an effective vaccine, social scientists have the tools to examine the impact of the pandemic on the way we live.
Join us for the NVivo Virtual Conference 2020, to meet, learn and network with peers and experts around the world as we examine global impacts on and trends in qualitative research. Customize your learning and networking experience by selecting from over 70 hours of programming available live the day of the event and on-demand for 90 days following the event.

Connect With The Global Research Community 
Join leading researchers from around the globe at the NVivo Virtual Conference 2020, to meet, learn and network with peers and experts as we examine global impacts on and trends in qualitative research. Customize your learning and networking experience by selecting from over 70 hours of programming available live on the day of the event and on-demand for 90 days following the event.

Your Keynote Speakers 
Hear from our keynote speakers who are world experts in using online research methods:
Nancy Baym, PhD Senior Principal Researcher, Microsoft Research, Cambridge, MA, USA
Nancy has written extensively on how people use communications technologies.

Annette Markham, PhD Professor of Media and Communications and part of the Digital Ethnography Research Group at RMIT, Melbourne, Australia
Annette has been involved in developing the Association of Internet Researchers’ Ethics Guidelines for Internet Research.

Sara Shaw, PhD Associate Professor, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Oxford University
Sara will be talking about her research on Qualitative Analysis of Remote Consultations and implications for impact of COVID-19 on GP practices.
 

Sessions



Welcome and Overview of the Conference

Chris Astle
Silvana di Gregorio
Stacy Penna
Chris Astle, CEO of QSR International opens the conference with a Welcome to all presenters and attendees. Silvana di Gregorio, QSR's Research Director and conference co-organiser, gives an overview of the papers, posters and panel submitted for the conference. Stacy Penna, QSR's Community Director and conference co-organizer, gives a tour of the virtual conference platform.

Sponsored by:


Sage Sponsored Paper: Doing rapid qualitative research

Cecilia Vindrola-Padros
The field of rapid qualitative research has a rich history and encompasses a wide range of research approaches. In this session, I engage with some of the definitions of rapid qualitative research and the situations when these approaches should and should not be used. I also provide a brief overview of the rapid research and rapid evaluation approaches that rely on qualitative research designs. I present the main challenges of conducting research rapidly and provide a brief description of a rapid qualitative appraisal we carried out during the COVID-19 pandemic to capture the perceptions and experiences of frontline healthcare workers. 

Sponsored by:


Remote Consultations in Health Care: what can qualitative analysis tell us about development and use

Sara Shaw
Over the past 10 years there has been a steady drive to make better use of video technology within health care. In the UK, Skype and similar platforms have been used in a range of settings (e.g. family medicine, mental health) and for a variety of uses (e.g. follow up consultations for long term conditions like diabetes, post-operative assessment). This brought significant challenges, particularly with regards to the implementation and routine use of video consulting in existing clinical pathways, as well as with the use of the technology itself. Despite popularity with patients, video consulting tended to be ad hoc. This all changed with the COVID-19 pandemic. Requirements for social distancing and concerns to manage spread have led to providers rapidly implementing video consulting services across the UK National Health Service. To make sense of these shifts, I draw on multiple research projects conducted over the past 10 years to explore changes in the design, development, implementation and use of video consulting. Reflecting on the design and conduct of these projects – some on-going through the pandemic – I draw out what qualitative analysis can tell us and why it is so vital to informing on-going health care provision.

Sponsored by:


Break

Stacy Penna
View Posters and Vendors in the Exhibition Hall
Network in SIGs in the Chat Lounge
Look out for Sponsors’ and Vendors’ presentation sessions


Sponsored by:


QSR-IIQM Research Grant Winner: Aint' I a Mother? Collage as a Method to explore Black Motherhood

Nicole Corley

Little is known about the subjective experiences of Black motherhood. Most research examining Black motherhood have been deficit-oriented, perpetuating harmful stereotypes of their existence. This presentation provides a snapshot of a qualitative project that aims to generate new meanings and gain greater insights into the experiences of Black mothers by allowing them to participate in a discourse that has largely excluded their voice. Using an arts-based method--collage-making--as a form of inquiry will allow researchers to explore, unveil, and center the complex layeredness of Black mothers lives. The process of collage making--cutting, pasting, and arranging--is a relatively simple way for Black mothers to explore their identity and (self) define who they are in their own unique and creative way. 



Sponsored by:


Alfasoft Vendor Presentation

Gustaf Dahlberg
Marret Bischewski
Alfasoft is partner to QSR and the distributor of NVivo and EndNote in northern Europe. In this presentation Gustaf Dahlberg (Manager EndNote & NVivo) and Marret Bischewski (NVivo certified trainer) will take you through how Alfasoft can help you and your organization.
 
In the presentation Gustaf will talk about how local representatives can help guiding you to the right NVivo product and license type. Marret will present training options and talk about a few reference customers that Alfasoft helped with NVivo licensing and training. You will also learn about the resources like Q&A sessions, videos, webinars, and a raffle that has been made available in Alfasoft’s conference booth. 


Sponsored by:


Challenges of conducting a research study in the time of COVID-19: adaption of qualitative research

Andrea McGrattan
The COVID-19 global pandemic has presented many unprecedented challenges. Conducting research in low and middle income countries (LMICs) comes with its own challenges, but the outbreak of COVID-19 has greatly impacted how studies are implemented in this setting, particularly with regards to data collection procedures. The Global Health Research Group on Dementia Prevention and Enhanced Care (DePEC) conducts mixed-method research into prevention and diagnostic strategies, and post-diagnostic dementia care in LMICs of Malaysia, India and Tanzania. Two of the five DePEC workstreams include a mixed-method, feasibility trial of a dietary intervention in Malaysia, and a qualitative interview study involving care providers and facilitators in each of our three partner LMICs.  These work streams have made methodological adaptions to how data is collected as a result of COVID-19.  Since the impact of COVID-19 on partner LMICs and the movement control measures taken by each has varied, tailored adaptations were necessary. This paper will present the qualitative data collection challenges experienced within one LMIC setting during the pandemic, particularly during a country wide lock-down with movement restrictions, and discuss the adaptions that have been implemented to overcome these barriers. Adaptions include the use of virtual and online methods for qualitative data collection and to deliver training to research staff, and changes in study methodology, moving from quantitative questionnaires to qualitative telephone interviews. Our experience will be useful for researchers in a similar situation, and will provide important considerations for the delivery and implementation of qualitative research studies going forward. 

Sponsored by:


Moving Research Online and Building Rapport with Participants as A PhD Student

Anna Teitz
The Covid-19 related lockdowns in a number of countries has meant that PhD students the world over have had to face starkly different realities in which to carry out research than ever imagined. In this paper presents the experiences of a PhD student, who was unable to meet participants in person due to the local lockdown regulations, rapidly shifted her research focus online. This move brought with it invaluable lessons about building and sustaining rapport with the participants. Developing a rapport with participants throughout the research process is an important consideration for any qualitative researcher – however more so for researchers engaging in online qualitative research. Much of the literature surrounding this topic argues that rapport building in online research is considerable harder to achieve than it is offline. Here it is argued that though there are challenges, the rapid shift from offline to online methods can also present unprecedented benefits to the way qualitative researcher work with their participants. In the case of this researcher, the shift to online methods allowed for more collaborative working, a higher level of rapport and sustained engagement from the participants, which would otherwise have been missing. 

Sponsored by:


Panel Intro: Remote research and programming with children and adolescents in low- and middle-income

Elona Toska

Remote research and programming with children and adolescents in low- and middle-income countries during COVID-19: barriers and facilitators
Elona Toska from the University of Cape Town introduces the panel topic and the presentations and their speakers.
Theme: Children and adolescents are bearing the brunt of the indirect effects of COVID-19 in LMIC, necessitating remote research and programming. Presenters from three research studies and an international NGO will discuss methodological challenges and innovations.


Sponsored by:


Panel #1: Embracing the change: MERL practice in an INGO during COVID-19

Jacqui Gallinetti
As a child-rights organisation, Plan International believes that involving children and young people in Monitoring, Evaluation and Research is important. Through listening to their views on issues that affect them we can better understand their lived realities and design stronger programmes and interventions. COVID-19 has meant we have had to change our ways of working so as not to put programme participants at risk. We have adapted data collection and ethics processes; engaged new tools and involved young people in more participatory ways of setting up data collection. Careful consideration of - and establishing measures to address - safeguarding and safety issues will be discussed. 

Sponsored by:


Panel #2: Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH): remote data collection with parenting programme

Hlengiwe Sacolo Gwebu
Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH): remote data collection with parenting programme implementers and stakeholders
PLH is a collaboration of researchers and practitioners founded to develop, test, and disseminate affordable and evidence-based parenting programs to reduce violence against children and improve child wellbeing. PLH programs have been used in over 25 countries. This mixed-methods study of PLH scale-up will generate evidence on program dissemination, implementation, family outcomes, and adaptations to COVID-19 in South Africa. We have designed remote recruitment, informed consent, and interview processes as part of this pilot. Methods include online and telephonic key informant interviews with stakeholders such as program facilitators and implementation coordinators.


Sponsored by:


COVID -19 Information for People Living with Asthma: A Rapid Review

Kirstie McClatchey

The COVID-19 pandemic poses a greater risk of more severe disease in some communities, such as people living with asthma. During this time, it is vital to support asthma self-management e.g. having a written asthma action plan and adhering to prescribed medication, to reduce unscheduled consultations and hospitalisations when health services are stretched. The study aim was to rapidly review currently available online COVID-19 information for people with asthma, to assess what information was being provided to minimise COVID-19 risk and encourage self-management.
Online information sources were identified at a global level, and from five majority native English speaking countries (Australia; Canada; New Zealand; United Kingdom [UK]; United States [US]). A total of 45 health information sources were identified (Global (n=6), Australia (n=4), Canada (n=7), New Zealand (n=9); UK (n=13), US (n=6)). Information for people defined as high-risk/vulnerable or those with long-term conditions e.g. asthma or respiratory conditions were downloaded on 20 April 2020 and on 18 May 2020. Downloaded webpages were uploaded into NVivo 11 and coded into multidisciplinary team developed nodes against the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for emergency risk communication (ERC) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) asthma guidelines. The global team worked across time zones using NVivo for their allocated areas, and a master NVivo file was created by merging files across the six areas. 
Preliminary findings highlight that most information providers adhere to WHO ERC guidelines. However, there is variation in the provision of NICE guideline related asthma self-management information. 


Sponsored by:


Participatory Action Research in Developing English Language Teacher Identity in Lebanon

Reine Azzi
The ultimate goal of my doctoral work is to create a space for in-service English teachers, in both schools and universities in Lebanon, to critically discuss the impact of English as a medium of Instruction (EMI) and as a foreign language, debating their attitudes, beliefs, and experience in the field. With an emphasis on participatory action research, my study sought to create a reflective practice model whereby a small group of in-service language teachers form collaborative teams to discuss their 'lived' reality. This would allow them to critique their current assumptions about teaching and learning English. Emphasis was on creating critical discussions that attempt to transform the status quo, especially on matters pertaining to linguistic and cultural dominance and power structures. Once the Covid-19 lockdown was announced in Lebanon in early March, though, I had to find an alternative means of working with my participants, who had still not met physically. The challenge was to find a virtual platform that also allowed opportunities for smaller group discussions during the session and to adapt my strategy accordingly. Once this platform was identified and I received the necessary ethical approval, I was able to broaden the group of participants to include teachers from different regions in the country, as their physical presence on campus was no longer an obstacle. This led to an even more diverse group of participants who later expressed their interest in creating a small ‘community of practice’ – one they found lacking in their own context.

Sponsored by:


Doing e-fieldwork: pros and cons of moving your research online.

Daniela Mardones-Bravo
Many qualitative researchers are facing the unprecedented challenge of not being able to do their fieldwork to gather data.  Without knowing when are we going to be allowed to travel again we have been forced to change their methodologies from classic paradigms of ethnography or interviews to online and digital methods. What happens next? This paper addresses the journey of moving research online and the hard decisions that researchers have to take to adapt their research but also all the benefits and unexpected advantages of doing in-depth interviews online instead of in person. It will cover the different stages from planning the e-fieldwork, ethical concerns, data management and analysis including the benefits of coding an online interview with NVivo.  

Sponsored by:


Panel #3: Lessons learned from (unplanned) remote training of researchers on qual research methods

Charnè Glinski
HEY BABY conducts mixed-methods research with adolescent parents and their health workers in South Africa. Current research aims to understand the impact of COVID-19 on the delivery of health services to adolescent parents. Methodological challenges have included delays in requisite ethical approvals to conduct responsive longitudinal COVID-19 work and adapting research methods for over-the-phone data collection with busy health workers and adolescents on sensitive issues. Lessons learned from remote training of researchers on qualitative research methods include a focus on self-care, creating structured-yet-flexible schedules, and providing workstations for researchers and their children.

Sponsored by:


Panel #4: Remote participatory- and art-based research with teen advisory groups at the UKRI GCRF

Lesley Gittings
Nokubonga Ralayo
Remote participatory- and art-based research with teen advisory groups at the UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub
TAG is an art-based, participatory study conducting research on the COVID-19 experiences, challenges and coping strategies of adolescents in South Africa and Kenya. Methodological challenges have included: remotely contacting a highly mobile group; responding to requests for food and psychosocial support; and access to technology, time and space for participation. Strategies include: engaging long-standing relationships with participants and social service providers; use of social media and designing research questions and methods in response to participant’s preferences. Approaches for flexibility and responsiveness to participant technology access, time, and preferred research platforms will be discussed. 


Sponsored by:


Modern Approaches to Data Collection: Recruitment and Sampling

Amy Andrada
Online and virtual methods are continually evolving, and as such are similar to technology. For this reason, both the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches demand attention. Online social networking has a significant influence on people’s lives, making it increasingly effective as a method for public engagement (Ryan 2013). As a tool for participant recruitment and retainment, the strategy potentially increases the of number of participants (especially with hard to reach groups and communities), the variation in samples, and serves as a cost-effective option. Alternatively, as with any method, the shortcomings of these approaches tend to result in smaller sample sizes and selection bias. Upon further inspection, the latter issue may be due, in part, to distrust of the researchers’ outsider status, disassociation with the target research group or community, and the innate passive feature of the strategy itself. Therefore, the researcher argues an established presence within target communities (online and physical), represented by continual engagement and outreach efforts, increase the likelihood of in-group status and/or group and community acceptance of researchers, resulting in improved recruitment efforts. In addition, efforts transitioning from recruitment to sampling, within online social networking, may be advantageous due to the increased use of online and virtual technologies (e.g. video messengers, audio tools, and other virtual ‘apps’ or applications). In turn, these evolve from recruitment tools to sample modes characterized within data collections instruments. Collectively, improvement of these focuses effectively benefit recruit efforts, sampling processes, and the overall methodological design.

Sponsored by:


Co-Designing During COVID-19: Using a Custom-Built Website to Conduct Participatory Design Research

Alice Spann
Mark Hawley
Luc de Witte
Marieke Spreeuwenberg

Our research uses a participatory design approach to investigate which and how technologies can support caregivers of people with dementia to better combine paid work and unpaid caregiving. The aim is to develop a self-help tool working caregivers can use to find suitable technological solutions for their individual challenges. Restricted access to research participants due to COVID-19 has a massive impact on participatory research and co-design studies which heavily rely on close interactions among and between participants and researchers. This requires new and innovative approaches to conduct participatory research.
 
Wix.com is an online platform that allows users to create free, professional websites tailored to their needs. We created a wix.com website to allow registered participants to read short blog posts about technologies identified in earlier studies. Participants were asked to rate from 1 to 5 how much they liked the technology and to leave a comment about a) their views and opinions regarding potential benefits or drawbacks of the technology, and/or b) their personal experience with this technology. Participants were also encouraged to engage with other participants’ comments. Furthermore, they were asked to comment on design aspects of the self-help tool for working caregivers.
 
Using a custom-built website to conduct participatory design research is a useful alternative to traditional face-to-face methods. While preparation (i.e. creating the website) is quite time and labour intensive, there are many benefits to consider which can make this method attractive even beyond the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Sponsored by:


Making the Case for Peer Research as a Participatory, Qualitative Method to Remotely Engage Diverse

Zoe Dibb
In order to understand how communities have experienced the impact of Covid-19 in the UK, in April 2020 The Young Foundation trained 18 peer researchers to conduct qualitative research with other residents in their local communities.Peer research offers a unique opportunity to include ‘non-professional’ researchers in qualitative research. Peer researchers use their lived experience and contextual understanding of communities to reach people across a wide spectrum of society, engage respondents who are less likely to take part in ‘traditional’ research and uncover authentic insights into their experiences.In response to the need for social distancing, our peer researcher training was adapted to be delivered digitally via Zoom over six weeks. The training was tailored for a diverse group with different levels of digital literacy and professional experience. In June 2020, 16 trained peer researchers commenced fieldwork to understand the impact of Covid-19 on people’s lives and their communities. Each peer researcher recruited five respondents from their personal networks (N = 80). They utilised Moto-G7 mobile phones and two apps (Cube ACR and Filemail) to securely record and share audio files.The need to shift from in-person analogue training and qualitative research methods to digital methods delivered remotely presented some challenges but on the whole allowed us to cut costs, continue research during the pandemic and interview respondents safely.This presentation will evaluate the effectiveness of the digital peer research training and data collection pilot with a focus on learning for the future scale up to a national peer research network.

Sponsored by:


Panel Discussion:Remote research and programming with children and adolescents in low- and middle

Elona Toska
Panel discussion on the presentations about - Remote research and programming with children and adolescents in low- and middle-income countries during COVID-19: barriers and facilitators 

Sponsored by:


Opening up: a qualitative longitudinal study on the aftermaths of COVID-19 for children and young pe

Jon Eilenberg

This project examines in real time how the COVID-19 lockdown aftermaths affect British children and young people and those looking after them. The nature of the pandemic and the responses to it are constantly changing, which creates huge variations in experiences and perceptions over short periods of time. Children and young people are among those impacted most by the pandemic (UN, 2020), with significant disruption to education, services and social lives. However, examining such rapidly changing experiences requires innovative methodological solutions. 
 
This project employs a longitudinal qualitative design, which allows for real-time comparisons between groups, following changes as and when they happen. It involves around 12 children and young people, 10 parents and carers, and 15 professionals working with children and young people. To include as many perspectives as possible, participants are recruited from a wide range of backgrounds, with particular attention given to people who have experiences of racial inequality, poverty and disability.  
 
Each participant gives a monthly semi-structured interview through 18 months, starting in August 2020, as schools and children’s services are expected to resume. The interviews across the three main groups will cover similar topics to enable comparisons. The interviews will be transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis in NVivo, which allows for tracking the changes in the thematic structure over time. 
 
Examining such a rapidly changing subject, the study and its methods need to be flexible and creative. As such, the methodology is continuously developed to adequately represent the participants and their experiences.  
 


Sponsored by:


Live Discursive Analysis of Minister of Health Daily COVID19 Reports:The Twitter Audience as Team

Gonzalo Bacigalupe
Daily reports by the Minister of Health in Chile have become a crisis communication ritual packed with uncertainty about the data and its definitions, the measures, and the political discourse that defines a failed herd immunity strategy. For months, on a daily basis, I have analyzed the strategy and in particular the discourse and discursive undertones by the government, becoming a scholar activist, co-founding and co-leading a multidisciplinary group of scientists and experts who have attempted to uncover the political, ethical, methodological, and policy dimensions that sustained a strategy to treat COVID_19 patients rather than to prevent, mitigate, and/or stop the contagion. In the process of analyzing the data "live" through comments made through Twitter, many in the community of followers have added to the analysis and feed a data analysis that it is fundamentally a form of collaborative crowd-qualitative-analysis. Triangulation and trustworthiness are in themselves an intrinsic part of the process and the core of this action research. A process that it is both: mobilizing and a form of knowledge creation. I believe the process may not work under the usual policy creation that defines the relation between science and politics but construe on an ongoing basis a form of discourse that brings dignity to the conversation in the public arena. A conversation that may educate and elicit non-binary and transdisciplinary forms of reflection that are so needed during a crisis.

Sponsored by:


Stakeholders Development Workshop: Implications for a Virtual Workshop

Azwa Shamsuddin
Azwa Shamsuddin, University of Edinburgh, on behalf of the Avoiding Patient Harm Through the Application of Prescribing Safety Indicators in English General Practices (PRoTeCT) team
We have undertaken a qualitative, longitudinal study aiming to generate recommendations for optimization and sustainable use of a pharmacist-led IT-based intervention for medication errors (PINCER) and a commercially available clinical decision support (CDS) software package in primary care using a consolidated learning exercise. As part of this learning exercise, data collection encompasses 3 stakeholder development workshops each involving up to 30 stakeholders, alongside interviews and documentary analysis. Our workshops are anticipated to take place towards the end of 2020 and our participants will include general practitioners, pharmacists, representatives from patient and pubic groups, leads of Clinical Commissioning Groups, academic colleagues who developed the intervention, commercial partners, clinical education and professional body representatives, and other key policy figures who may be influential in the longer-term sustainment of both interventions in England. Due to the current COVID-19, it is anticipated that social distancing measures will need to be in place for the foreseeable future, raising challenges for researchers in the design and delivery of stakeholder workshops such as ours. This paper outlines the practicalities and implications of moving workshops online, considerations of online platforms for virtual workshops, ethical considerations for online data collection, impact on recruitment and quality of data, as well as challenges faced by the researcher in preparing for the online workshops. By sharing our experiences and opinions, we hope to generate discussion in this important area so that other researchers may benefit.


Sponsored by:


The experiences of on-call physiotherapists in the Intensive Care Unit before & during the COVID-19

Angeliki Perdikari
Mo Al-Haddid

Background: Hospital based physiotherapists in the UK undertake emergency on-call duties covering hospital departments 24/7. Being called out to the ICU can be complex and stressful, especially for those not specialising in respiratory care. During the pandemic, on-call physiotherapists were on the frontline of health care delivery. Despite this and the frequency with which on-call physiotherapists care for patients in ICU, inquiries into the on-call physiotherapists’ experiences when called to the ICU are limited. 
 
Aims: The purpose of this study is to understand: 1) How on-call physiotherapists experience being called out to the ICU; 2) Whether it was different during the pandemic and 3) If so, in what ways? 
Setting: On-call physiotherapists working in three large University Hospitals in the Glasgow area, Scotland, UK will be recruited until data saturation is reached. 
 
Methods: Data collection will involve one-to-one semi-structured interviews using a videoconferencing platform. Interviews will be video recorded using the platform’s recording feature. Host control features and meeting security settings will be enabled. Video files will be stored in the University networked computers and will be accessed remotely. Once verbatim transcribed and pseudonymised they will be imported into NVivo. Data analysis will be conducted using the inductive Thematic Analysis method. NVivo 12 Plus for Windows and Mac will be used to group the responses to each question, run a word frequency query, generate codes independently by two researchers, group related nodes together in a hierarchy and create mind maps to visually explore potential concepts and communicate findings.
 


Sponsored by:


Outings Online: A Critique of Place in Digital Ethnography

Taylor Price
Participatory data collection is becoming increasingly valuable for contemporary social theory. Yet, I suggest that the root image of digital research sites – as spaces/places – among digital participant-observers and internet ethnographers remains a stumbling block to sound digital participatory research methodology. After providing a critical reflection of space/place as the “root image” employed by social scientists to make sense of their “online field sites”, I argue that an alternative root image of digital research sites – as (mediated or synthetic) “gatherings” – enables social scientists to produce more sound theories of interpersonal processes and meaning-making within digital platforms. Further, I suggest that explicit discussions of metaphorical language among social scientists is necessary for the development and refinement of (digital) social research programs. More concretely, explicit debates over the core imagery of our digital research sites can strengthen justifications for research designs that include “digital field work” and can contribute to the development of robust and transposable explanatory concepts. Throughout this paper presentation I will compare and contrast the value that these two root images impart to social researchers throughout data collection and data analysis while drawing on previous research in sociology, anthropology, and pragmatics, as well as my ongoing participatory research at video conferenced open mic events.

Sponsored by:


Using NVivo for Authentic Undergraduate Research Experiences

Rachel Shanks
A five-day workshop called ‘Applied Qualitative Research Training’ was run for undergraduates at the University of Aberdeen in May 2019. Twelve students learnt the different tools and functions in NVivo for qualitative data analysis. During the training the students used NVivo to create a data set of school uniform policies and dress codes in all publicly funded secondary schools in Scotland (n=357). The research explored the reasons that schools give for their uniform/dress code policies, how the policies are worded, who is consulted about the policy and what information is given in relation to disability, additional support needs, religious and philosophical belief. Information was also collected in relation to the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation. The students all voluntarily completed consent forms agreeing for their work to be used by the presenter. There was funding to pay for out-of-pocket expenses such as travel, childcare, drinks and meals. The students discussed and agreed upon codes to use, attributes and attribute values, for example a code for ‘decency’. The students uploaded statistical information on each school from Scottish Government sources, school uniform policies, school handbooks and photographs. They assigned attributes to each school case, coded documents, PDFs and photos. They created visual maps, conducted queries and we checked for intercoder reliability (>90%). As a result of the training five of the students were employed at the university to conduct further research and/or teaching and three of the students are working on manuscripts for publication with the presenter based on the research findings.

Sponsored by:


Opportunities and Challenges of Going Virtual: the PERSIST Science Camps

Helena Vicente
Ana Delicado
João Estevens
Jussara Rowland
What are the knowledges, beliefs, and perceptions of European students about science? The PERSIST_EU (Erasmus+) is an EU-funded project that aims to understand what undergraduate students think regarding four controversial scientific topics - climate change, complementary and alternative medicines, GMOs, and vaccines - in five countries: Germany, Italy, Portugal, Slovakia, and Spain. The project was organising Science Camps that would bring face to face 100 students in each partner country to an open debate with experts on the four topics. They were scheduled to happen between March and April 2020. However, due to the new coronavirus they had to be canceled. This communication aims to present how the Persist_EU team have redesigned their strategy to keep the project ongoing during the lockdown and COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, the Lisbon Science Camp would take place on March 21. By that time universities were already closed, students were having online classes, and some even went back to their homelands. How to adapt the Science Camps to virtual environments? How to engage young people to participate in an online scientific event during a pandemic? Would the experts be available to participate in a different format? What new ethical considerations should be taken into account? Could we reach new participants without having a direct interaction with the students? What were the advantages and disadvantages of going online?Those were the methodological challenges faced by the teams, to be discussed in this communication.

Sponsored by:


Welcoming New Life Under Lockdown:A Qualitative Study Exploring the Experiences of First Time Mother

Anna Gray
The physiological, psychological and social changes associated with having a baby for the first time are commonly associated with adverse effects on mental health. Risk factors include a lack of postpartum support (Milgrom et al., 2008), loneliness (Lee et al., 2017), and challenging relationships with the partner (Buist et al., 2003). First-time mothers are specifically at risk (Parfitt & Ayers, 2014).The COVID-19 pandemic has seen significant disruption to the daily lives of the global population. These changes are particularly pertinent for new parents; midwife visits are reduced, NCT groups have been cancelled, and social isolation has made practical support almost impossible. These unexpected changes to the landscape of new parenthood are likely to be impacting the wellbeing of first-time mothers trying to navigate this new world. The aim of this research is to develop a greater understanding of the needs and experiences of first-time mothers during the COVID-19 outbreak in the UK. We are conducting a cross sectional semi-structured interview study. Qualitative data will be analysed using thematic analysis. The recruitment of up to 30 women via postnatal support Facebook groups will allow us to develop a rich and complex understanding of the experiences and opinions of our participants but also be small enough to conduct case-by-case analysis from individuals we speak to.We hope the findings from this research will highlight the needs of this population and inform public policy on how they can best be met for the remainder of the current pandemic and any future pandemics.

Sponsored by:


Amid a Global Pandemic:Scaling-Up an Education Program Evaluation with NVivo11Pro & a Significantly

Holly Bozeman
Valerie Orellana
In fall 2014, a technology company awarded Westat with a grant to conduct an evaluation of their new initiative to provide under-resourced schools with digital technologies to enhance teaching and learning. The program, conducted in eight middle schools across the United States, provided assistance to the schools and access to the tablets, both in schools and at home. The evaluation was conducted by four researchers and used in-person site visits to develop school-level case studies to document program implementation and impact. By Spring 2020, the program had significantly scaled-up. The evaluation team prepared to collect data from 42 schools, within 17 school districts nationwide. Instead of site visits and case studies, the team planned to conduct telephone interviews and surveys of approximately 400 school principals, teachers, and instructional coaches participating in the program. To do so, the evaluation team increased in size, expertise, and employed NVivo 11 Pro as the centralized tool for organizing and analyzing interview data. Through this work, the evaluation team faced several challenges—some anticipated and one unforeseen. Anticipated challenges included working with a team of 13 qualitative analysts (some with NVivo and some without) to conduct descriptive coding of interview data. Due to COVID19, the team was forced to redesign data collection and analysis procedures to capture pandemic-related reflections and impacts. However, through team collaboration and a well-organize NVivo database, the evaluation activities remained on schedule to provide timely perspective of program impact during unprecedented times.

Sponsored by:


Teaching NVivo using the Five-Level QDA Method: Adaptations for Synchronous Online Learning

Christina Silver
Sarah L. Bulloch
One aspect of our lives that has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic is the way that we learn and teach. Using our week long MSc module “Harnessing NVivo” as the context, we discuss how our approach to teaching and learning NVivo – the Five-Level QDA method – weathered the necessary adaptations in the online context. The Five-Level QDA method is a pedagogy for teaching and learning dedicated qualitative software like NVivo that is designed to transcend methodologies and teaching modes. Although successfully used by others in online teaching, prior to the pandemic we ourselves had primarily used the Five-Level QDA method in face-to-face teaching and learning encounters. In this paper we describe the adaptations made in preparing and delivering the module as a synchronous online workshop, reflecting on the changes that worked well, as well as those that did not. We discuss how we reassessed our instructional objectives in light of the general characteristics and challenges of the online context, and the specificities of the video conferencing platform we used: Zoom. We describe the subsequent changes we made to course materials, the sequencing and timing of content delivery, and how we sought to foster interaction amongst participants and between us and them. We conclude by reflecting on the pros and cons of synchronous teaching and learning of NVivo in face-to-face and online contexts.Dr Christina Silver & Dr Sarah L Bulloch

Sponsored by:


Alien Time Capsules:An Online Participatory Arts-based Approach for COVID-19 Research with Adolescen

Lesley Gittings
Nabeel Petersen
Background:Social and health vulnerabilities experienced by adolescents in South Africa are exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Little is known about their unique experiences, challenges and coping strategies. Context-specific, age-appropriate, and social justice-informed COVID-19 research is needed.
Method:This research sought to determine how to conduct remote, art-based, participatory research with adolescents during COVID-19.Teen advisory group members co-developed a COVID-19 sub-study with researchers from the UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub. In a series of phone conversations, participants (n=8, ages 15-23) advised on topics, methods and platforms for remote research with their groups in two South African provinces.
Findings:Advisors suggested: (1) Focusing on COVID-19-related experiences, challenges and coping strategies using participatory and arts-based methods including writing, pictures, audio and video; and (2) Facebook as a platform which can be used data-free in South Africa and password-protected on multiple devices for adolescents without personal phones. An ‘Alien Time Capsule’ concept was designed: “Kind Aliens have come to Earth and want to know what young people are experiencing with COVID-19 so they can help. As Earth’s ambassadors, let’s fill up this time capsule and give it to these Aliens!”. This scenario aims to create conceptual distance and encourage creativity and playfulness. Each advisory group has a virtual ‘Time Capsule’ (closed Facebook group) with weekly activities.
Discussion:Engaging adolescents as knowledge-holders is a powerful way to inform context-specific, social justice research during COVID-19. Adolescent advisors are well-placed to co-develop research questions, tools and methods that are responsive to their own contexts, interests and needs.


Sponsored by:


Welcome and Overview of the Conference

Chris Astle
Silvana di Gregorio
Stacy Penna
Chris Astle, CEO of QSR International opens the conference with a Welcome to all presenters and attendees. Silvana di Gregorio, QSR's Research Director and conference co-organiser, gives an overview of the papers, posters and panel submitted for the conference. Stacy Penna, QSR's Community Director and conference co-organizer, gives a tour of the virtual conference platform.

Sponsored by:


Break

Silvana di Gregorio
View Posters and Vendors in the Exhibition Hall
Network in SIGs in the Chat Lounge
Look out for Sponsors’ and Vendors’ presentation sessions


Software Shop Vendor: Qualitative research and technological mediation in a changing world

Clemencia Navarro
The current context has created challenges for qualitative researchers, who had to adapt their methodologies to an environment where technological mediation prevails in social interactions, as an alternative to confinement measures. But, what about the opportunities? 
Qualitative research is also the language for innovation and change, and in that sense we are facing a unique opportunity to evolve methodologies and contribute to the understanding of the current situation, and the possible consequences that it will bring in the medium to long term. Aspects of this debate are mentioned in this session, as well as elements that can work as a starting point to ease innovation and adaptation processes in the face of challenges that arise from specific social contexts, as is the case of Latin American countries.


Sponsored by:


Improving Research Team Collaboration with NVivo

Stacy Penna
The presentation will share tools for how to manage NVivo projects among team members, track decisions, as well as compare and view coding across team members. See how NVivo can support your team to collaborate effectively together on a research project.

Sponsored by:


The Place of the Technology in Online Research

Nancy Baym
Given the realities of physical distancing and working-from-home during a pandemic, researchers used to doing their research in person may find themselves turning to online forums and networks as new fields for their scholarship. In doing so, it can be easy to overlook or, conversely, overemphasize the roles of the digital technologies and platforms themselves in the phenomena of interest. This talk provides a framework thinking about the place of technology. It explores three common misperceptions that can limit your research, and offers a model for understanding digital media platforms. Throughout, the talk draws on Dr. Baym’s three decades of research into online relationships and media.
 


Sponsored by:


Break

Silvana di Gregorio
View Posters and Vendors in the Exhibition Hall
Network in SIGs in the Chat Lounge
Look out for Sponsors’ and Vendors’ presentation sessions


What’s new in NVivo

Stacy Penna
Watch this presentation showing the new features of NVivo, released in March 2020. The five main feature streams relating to the changes for NVivo include: improved NVivo user experience, getting started tools for new users, enhanced coding experience and visualizations, introduction of Office 365 integration and new project sharing collaboration features.

Sponsored by:


Ask Dr. Salmons: Live Q & A about Online Qualitative Research

Janet Salmons
Janet grew up with stories about the sad loss of the first Dr. Salmons to the Spanish Flu, and lived with the family repercussions. What were the lived experiences of people in that time? Alas, we must now ask, what are the lived experiences in today’s pandemic? Future generations will want to know, so qualitative research is needed! Whether you are designing new studies to explore these issues, or reframing and redesigning your study to conduct it online, bring your questions to this interactive session. Whatever questions Janet can’t answer will be discussed in follow-up posts on www.methodspace.com

Sponsored by:


Building bridges for collaboration through virtual methods during the pandemic

Francesca Pabale
Angelie Ignacio
Clara Rebello
With the impact of a global pandemic, COVID-19 has challenged the way teams engage in research. Particularly, it posits the challenge of navigating and developing solutions to delegate tasks effectively. As a result of limited in-person interaction, the process of conducting research in teams has resulted in adapting methods conducive to maintaining a collaborative setting. By using several platforms, such as Zoom and GSuite, these modalities provide a resource for team building and discourse. Our study, which aims to examine the emerging self through means of creative writing, utilizes qualitative analysis to extract themes from these stories. In employing a mixed methods approach, qualitative data is crucial to integrating depth and meaning to support quantitative measures. The share screen feature in Zoom enables the team to examine the process of qualitative data analysis using NVivo.After coding each object under a specific category of meaning, a thematic analysis of object meaning uncovered significant relationships among the objects participants used in their stories. A narrative analysis was carried out to determine the extent to which all four objects in a story are integrated together. The data from these analyses led to the creation and implementation of an index for depth of meaning for the narratives.Hence, in employing several strategies of virtual communication, qualitative research in teams aims to creatively build bridges which emphasizes on the value of collaboration in times of isolation.

Sponsored by:


How using NVivo enhanced the thematic analysis of various data sources in research involving childre

Eleanor  Hollywood
Ben Meehan
Case study research typically yields a large volume of data with evidence collated from various sources. This poses a challenge for the researcher since the organisation, management and analysis of such data is not straight forward. In order to explore the health and well-being related experiences of children from disadvantaged areas the author conducted research with several families. This case study research consequently yielded a diverse data set including interview data, children’s drawings, media reports, fieldnotes and online maps. Each data source collated contributed to the formation of ‘the case’ and thus it was imperative that the selected analytical framework facilitated the analysis of all data sources. Braun and Clarke’s (2012) six-step approach to thematic analysis was chosen as the analytical strategy for the research. In order to enable the management and analysis of data via the selected strategy, the author made the decision to use NVivo (version 11). The adoption of NVivo enabled the use of a variety of coding strategies during the six-step thematic approach to data analysis. The use of NVivo also helped to ensure the clear representation of the voice of the child within the research which was one of the primary objectives of the study. The aim of this paper is to provide a detailed account of how NVivo can be used in an innovative way to facilitate a stepped approach to qualitative thematic analysis involving various data sources.

Sponsored by:


Virtual Focus Groups with Photo-elicitation Excercise: Insights and Recommendations for Qualitative

Samantha Brady
Julie Miller

The continued spread of COVID-19 and implementation of varying physical distancing restrictions will likely impact in-person qualitative research for the foreseeable future. As a result, researchers are pivoting to virtual methods of qualitative data collection. In March 2020, the MIT AgeLab shifted a data collection protocol for a study from in-person focus groups to virtual focus groups. The aim of the study was to understand how members of two generations, GenZ and GenX, view work and careers, and how economic and world events, such as the Great Recession or the COVID-19 pandemic, influence how generations view and make decisions regarding their career paths. The study included eight focus groups through the Zoom platform with 41 participants between the ages of 18-23 and 40-55. Focus groups included a virtual photo-elicitation exercise to more deeply explore the emotions participants attach to work and careers. While preliminary results of this study highlight the differential experiences and values of GenZ and GenX regarding their careers, this study also demonstrates the promise of virtual focus groups and virtual photo elicitation tasks as additional methodological tools for qualitative researchers. The study demonstrated several benefits of using a virtual platform for qualitative research, including the ability to reach participants across geographic areas, greater financial feasibility and increased convenience for participants. This study also offers insight into how to effectively engage virtual participants through the use of interactive tools and facilitation techniques better suited for the virtual group environment. 
 
Authors: 
Samantha Brady, MPA; Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab
Julie Miller, PhD
Joseph F. Coughlin, PhD


Sponsored by:


Coping with COVID-19: Ways patients with rheumatoid arthritis alter their behavior to reduce their r

Melanie Cozad

Background and Purpose: The coronavirus pandemic poses a substantial threat to people whose immune systems are compromised from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). People with RA are at greater risk for developing infections because their immune system attacks healthy cells within the body’s joints. The disease’s main treatments also suppress parts of the immune system elevating a patient’s risk of developing coronavirus if exposed. This study’s purpose was to gather patients’ perspectives on how they may have altered their behavior in order to cope with the increased risk coronavirus poses to their health.   
 
Methods: Qualitative, semi-structured, interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 16 participants. Participants were recruited from one rheumatology clinic within a major health system within the southeastern United States. As a result of the pandemic timing, 3 interviews were in person and 13 were conducted virtually. A multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional team also navigated using virtual sessions to apply grounded theory toward analyzing changing themes emerging from patients in real-time. 
 
Preliminary Results: Participants were mostly female and represented a diversity of races with an average age of 54 years. Over 70% had another chronic condition in addition to RA. A major theme among participants was initially downplaying the effects of COVID-19 on their behavior but then coming to the realization that they were making significant lifestyle changes. These changes included staying home, not getting together in person with friends and family, and trying to limit other activities such as going out to eat and exercising.


Sponsored by:


How to Simultaneously Analyze Visual & Audio YouTube Data: It’s Not Just What They Say, but How They

Laura Knowles
Jorden Cummings
How to Simultaneously Analyze Visual & Audio YouTube Data: It’s Not Just What They Say, but How They Say it and Where They Say It Too
YouTube provides qualitative researchers with access to a wide range of public data; it is the second most visited website in the world, with billions of views per month. Moreover, this data is naturalistically occurring. Platforms like YouTube are participatory spaces that allow users to manipulate their online space, and the online space of others. Users create and view content, and engage through likes, dislikes, and comments. One challenge with analyzing YouTube data, however, is the simultaneous presentation of multiple information sources like background visuals/setting, nonverbal body language of the YouTuber, and content of their speech, Previous research on YouTube has focused on content analysis, analysis of comments, still images and verbal transcriptions, with a tendency to engage in only one source of information per analysis.
In this presentation, we discuss a method for simultaneously analyzing these multiple information inputs, using our study of YouTuber’s presentation of self-care practices as an example. Rather than focusing on only one information source (e.g., spoken words), we explored what they say, but also how they say it, and how they show it. This necessitated in-depth analysis of video and audio simultaneously. Netnography was used to collect relevant, active, and rich online data. We discussed how visuals and audio were transcribed together using our four columns approach (i.e., timestamp, setting, scene, and audio). We then combined this approach with Braun and Clarke’s (2013) recommendations for thematic analysis. This novel approach can assist other researchers with analysis of YouTube’s wealth of data on the human experience.


Sponsored by:


Taking a Human-Centered Approach to Higher Education Research and Analysis

Namita Mehta
Lauren Barrett
Traditionally, teaching and learning in higher education has been designed to allocate most, if not all, power and agency in the classroom to instructors, with students being passive learners of their education. Through the years, there has been a greater emphasis on student-centered approaches that entail empowering students to be active learners who direct their own educational experience. This student-centered ethos, along with an increase of technologically mediated pedagogical approaches at the university level, has prompted the Academic Technology Design Team to explore user experience (UX) research methods to better understand how they fit into our approach of understanding and improving learning processes across the University of Colorado Boulder campus. This approach entails using multiple sources of data to understand both the faculty and student experience, the campus community, and broader educational experience. NVivo allows us to load student survey data, student concept drawings, faculty interviews, observation notes, and any analytic memos to better understand a complex educational problem. In this paper, we explore how the Academic Technology Design Team at CU Boulder uses NVivo to analyze multiple data sources as a team to better understand and refine our research questions through participatory methods. To do this, we draw on a current project called Learning Spaces: Assessing Technology Needs in the Classroom. For this exploratory project, the team took a triangulated data gathering approach and used participatory methods to better understand technology needs and roadblocks from a variety of perspectives: students, faculty, and university support staff.

Sponsored by:


Adapting and Expanding Qualitative Research methods for Evaluating Establishment Surveys and Forms

Temika Holland
Rebecca Keegan
The U.S. Census Bureau routinely undertakes qualitative research to inform survey design decisions. With the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on our social and work environments, qualitative researchers had to quickly adapt their methodology, particularly for cognitive and usability evaluations of establishment surveys and forms during a time when businesses were severely impacted. With strict deadlines and objectives, solutions needed to be effective and efficient, while meeting government legal and security requirements. Remote testing that uses technology to allow both the researcher and the participant to be in separate locations, offered an effective solution, but not without challenges.Unique characteristics of conducting research with establishments (typically requiring travel to respondents’ places of business to conduct testing) led to a number of considerations associated with implementing such a method. These included recruitment and training for using the platform for testing, outlining and verifying the computing requirements for using remote testing software, modifying testing protocols intended for in-person interviews, and addressing security concerns for a remote testing environment both with establishments and the Census Bureau. This presentation describes the development and implementation of a remote testing environment for qualitative research with establishment surveys that maintains the integrity of the research methods and results, while meeting the challenges at the intersection of the pandemic’s impact on businesses, the unique characteristics of establishment surveys, and government legal and security requirements. Additionally, we discuss differences between in-person and remote testing and lessons learned as we continue to adapt and expand our testing methods for establishment surveys.

Sponsored by:


GAMBIA case study on controlling trachoma transmission by improved environmental practices and its l

James Tchokogoue
GAMBIA case study on controlling trachoma transmission by improved environmental
practices and its lessons on how it can help the fight against covid-19 in the USA


This research paper will explore the environmental aspects of trachoma transmission and prevention. The research will draw from many examples and studies conducted around the world that has or had trachoma. Most of the research however will focus on the Gambia. The author was in the Gambia from December 2019 to February 2020. The focus of the prevention strategy will be drawn from the SAFE program funded by the UN to help eliminate trachoma. Trachoma is a deadly bacterial disease that affects the eyes and spreads rapidly in communities that have lack of healthcare and access to basic sanitation. After field observations in conjunction with a thorough review of the supporting articles, the author suggests that access to clean water, hand washing and proper toilet construction reduces the burden of trachoma. These three things are adequate in the fight against trachoma transmission supported with antibiotics. This coincidentally can help prevent covid-19. Covid-19 is a disease that spreads similarly to trachoma. Close contact and poor hygiene practices increase the transmission in both cases. The Gambia and other countries used manual type intervention strategies to sustain the reduction of trachoma. The United States can take these lessons and implement them to slow down transmission while scientists make a vaccine for covid-19. Through a thorough literature review and field observations by the author through an ethnographic approach, this project shows results that supported hand washing and access to clean water as essential to prevention of trachoma or covid-19. Barrier practices such as social distancing does not hold as much importance as hand hygiene due to human behavior.


Sponsored by:


Audio-Recorded Diaries in Kenya: Using a Socially Distanced Approach to Data Collection in a Low-Inc

Lila Rabinovich
The COVID-19 pandemic has restricted opportunities for traditional qualitative field research. In an ongoing study led by a team at USC’s Center for Economic and Social Research, we have been studying the personal financial management practices and preferences of low-income women in Kenya, through in-depth interviews and focus groups. Recognizing the significant economic challenges now facing households with low and uncertain incomes globally, we added a new module to our study to examine how women are coping financially on a day-to-day basis with the health and economic emergency unleashed by the pandemic. In order to comply with social distancing guidelines, we decided to deploy a solicited diaries approach to data collection. Solicited diaries aim to elicit every-day experiences on particular themes, and allow the capture of in-depth personal perspectives in the context of day to day activities, emotions and interactions. Specifically, we will use “audio recorded diaries”, an adapted diary approach to account for literacy constraints and limited access to personal computers. A sample of twenty of our existing sample of women are asked to submit entries every day for a total of one week. The diaries will help us understand what financial services women still use or rely on during this time, what barriers they may experience to accessing financial services and products, and what supporting intervention they may benefit from. This presentation will discuss the audio-recorded diary approach, challenges and opportunities faced in its deployment in our study setting, adaptations, and lessons for use in Kenya and elsewhere.

Sponsored by:


COVID-19 Interruptions: Transitioning focus groups from in-person to online

Teresa Kline
This paper will provide a narrative discussion of how we transitioned planned in-person focus groups to an online format, due to disruptions from the COVID-19 pandemic. For a recent study, we had planned to conduct three in-person focus groups onsite at the organization that was the focus of our evaluation. When the pandemic made it clear in-person would not be an option, the moderator guides had already been drafted and the focus groups had been scheduled. This paper will discuss (1) our decision to shift to an online format, (2) the changes we made to the methodology to ensure online groups would run smoothly (i.e., asking respondents to identify themselves by name when they begin speaking, in lieu of physical name tags), and (3) the challenges we encountered in conducting groups online (i.e., low bandwidth affecting ability to use video, how to keep track of which respondents haven’t participated much, loss of body language cues). Based on this experience, we will identify best practices and lessons learned for future online focus groups.

Sponsored by:


Himalayan Youth Co-Research Collaboration with NVIVO during Changing Research Geographical Settings

Adrian Khan
The Himalayan regions of Nepal contain some of the most remote villages in the world. Yet with globalizing narratives pushing the agenda of all children under the age of 18 having access to formal education extending to these villages, there has been an increasing shift towards young people (trans)migrating to pursue ‘better’ educational experiences in different geographical settings across Nepal and around the world. However, with the COVID-19 crisis closing schools across Nepal and restricting applications for study and work abroad, youth have increasingly started to return to their villages to engage with their communities of birth on important social issues that affect people’s survival and quality of life. Nevertheless, despite increasing bodies of research on young people’s migration decisions, there remains little work on research, with, young people methodologically engaging in (trans)migration research in Nepal. Drawing on ongoing longitudinal research since 2010, this paper focused on the methodological process of engaging in Participatory Action Research (PAR) with young people in Nepal through collaborating with four Himalayan youth co-researchers. Co-researchers assisted with tracing major school/work transitions of over 150 Himalayan participant experiences within and outside of Nepal during the COVID-19 pandemic.Overall, this paper focuses on the intricate process of training and collaborating with Himalayan co-researchers and navigates how NVIVO training workshops with co-researchers (with emphasis on using NVIVO for qualitative collaborative coding) established a participatory framework that engaged a reflexive and equitable framework for PAR in Nepal, with young people, during changing geographical settings due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Sponsored by:


A Thematic Analysis of Between Session Activities of Counseling Clients

Rachel Tambling
The contribution of between session tasks to psychotherapy outcome has been well documented and many models of psychotherapy utilize homework as an important component of treatment. Despite widespread use of between session tasks as a therapeutic technique, there is limited information about the completion of between session tasks. Through a qualitative thematic analysis of daily diary responses, themes in between session tasks, as reported by clients of two university-based counseling centers in the United States, were discovered.
Data were collected through a daily diary format. Consenting individuals were asked to complete a short (approximately 20 minutes) daily diary on a daily basis for the first 28 days they were in engaged in therapy. The Daily Diary of Events in Couple Therapy was developed based on the Daily Inventory of Stressful Events (Almeida, Wethington, & Kessler, 2002) to assess events that may impact individuals’ daily life. One such question, “Did you try something from therapy?” was used for the present analysis. Responses were recorded as either a yes or no and a subsequent follow up question prompted the respondent to indicate what was done. Thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) was conducted with data organized in NVivo. This method emphasizes both organization and rich description of the data, going beyond simple content analysis to explore explicit or implicit meaning within the text.
Findings suggested that many clients completed between session tasks. Themes in tasks reported were: Communication and related behaviors; love, acceptance, and emotional work; and task-oriented behaviors.


Sponsored by:


Parent-Child Illness Narratives: A Dyadic Grounded Theory Analysis

Jackie Williams-Reade
In pediatric chronic illness, little is known about the relational interactions between adolescent patients, parents, and illnesses and how they influence management of the illness. To address this, we elicited illness narratives (Kleinman, 2988) through face-to-face interviews with 32 individuals (16 dyads) representing adolescents diagnosed with a chronic illness and their primary parent who had been referred to a psychosocial treatment program for challenges with illness management. Interviews were conducted individually and analyzed dyadically using grounded theory to better understand the interconnected emotional processes that may be contributing to illness management difficulties. Results include a theory of patient-parent illness responses and how parental illness meanings play a role in adolescent self-management. During our presentation, we will highlight the use of a dyadic analysis of individual interviews and share how this analytic method resulted in a more in-depth and relational understanding of how illness narratives of pediatric patients and family members mutually influence the illness experience. Increased understanding of the interconnected illness narratives of parent/child will provide insight into treatment factors that can facilitate or impede emotional healing of patients and family members as they grapple with the far-reaching effects of pediatric illness.

Sponsored by:


Togetherness and Fear: Rural and Urban Cultures During COVID-19

Víctor Manuel Rubio Carrillo
Natalie Lopez
Joshua Argueta
David Echeverría
Sebastián López
Cristina Duque
Víctor Manuel Rubio Carrillo, University of Miami; Natalie Vanessa Lopez, Fulford Elementary School; Joshua Argueta, Sweetwater Elementary School; David Fernando Echeverría Valencia, Universidad de los Hemisferios; Sebastián López Prado, Colegio de Bachillerato en Artes Luis Humberto Salgado Torres; & Cristina Duque, Vidarte Search in Movement
Background: Just as the COVID-19 pandemic began, five members of the Action Research Network of the Americas established a foundation. The Musical Learning Action Research Community was approved. A month later, we had a fortunate encounter with another member working from Java, Indonesia, and now this action research community is working on 16 different projects to enrich and capture the cultural perspective of the current situation across continents.
Methods: We have been documenting the personal testimonies of people across continents through educational processes, video recordings, interviews, public dialogue, artistic creations, observations, and collected documents and artifacts. In so doing, we have analyzed the multiple ways in which people improvise and adapt to something so all-consuming and unexpected. We are working on various projects in which NVivo is being used as a mechanism to code and organize our data to aid us in generating narratives, video productions, and understandings of the cultural differences across the world.
Findings: Around the world, we have observed the vast disparities prompted by current social systems. Among those, we have documented the differences between public and private university responses in Ecuador. We have also evidenced the difficulties faced by public-school music teachers in Miami, and the pronounced contrast with others in similar situations in Ecuador. Cultural differences between urban and rural responses to the pandemic have prompted us to reflect. In urban centers, confinement, curfews, and instilling fear in each other became the norm. In contrast, rural areas relied heavily on their community work and used togetherness as the drive to overcome hardship.


Sponsored by:


Harnessing Youth and Family Voice Using Virtual Methods

Colleen Smith
Brittany Jean Taylor
To determine the impact of a substance use recovery program on youth and their families, researchers at Georgia Health Policy Center’s Center of Excellence for Children’s Behavioral Health at Georgia State University used both virtual and in-person data collection methods. Three types of participants were included: youth currently enrolled in the program; caregivers of youth currently enrolled in the program; and youth who had graduated from the program. Currently enrolled youth were being interviewed individually via telephone while at the program site and caregivers were being interviewed using an in-person focus group format. When the covid-19 pandemic reached the United States, the program transitioned to virtual service delivery. Likewise, data collection methods were adjusted. Currently enrolled youth continued to be interviewed by telephone; however, youth were contacted directly at their place of residence rather than at the program site. The remaining caregiver focus groups remained in group format but were conducted virtually rather than in person. Telephone interviews with youth who graduated from the program continued individually by telephone as planned. This paper explores the pros and cons of conducting telephone interviews with youth and challenges faced when implementing a trauma-informed lens using this approach. Additionally, the paper will report the study team’s experience conducting virtual focus groups with caregivers of varying levels of technological access and comfort.

Sponsored by:


Using NVivo to Review Comments on Organ Transplantation Rules

James Alcorn
Joann White
UNOS is a private organization that operates the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) under contract with the federal government. The OPTN is a “unique public-private partnership that links all professionals involved in the U.S. donation and transplantation system.” The OPTN issues national rules regarding organ transplantation. Each rule is sponsored by an OPTN committee that is comprised of community members. Similar to regulatory bodies, the OPTN collects public comment on these rules before they are enacted. Comments are reviewed not only for consistency in sentiment but also for diversity of thought. Minority perspectives are highlighted for the sponsoring committees. This allows the OPTN to detect trends across community segments.
Comments are collected via an online platform and facilitated in-person and virtual meetings around the country. A staff team uses NVivo to analyze the comments for the sponsoring committees.
• Prior to the start of public comment, staff add potential topics in NVivo as potential nodes. The NVivo team meets weekly during public comment to discuss findings, approaches, and refine the list of nodes.
• We collect demographic information, sentiment scores, and written comments online.
• The sponsoring committee receives interim and final staff reports that allow them to participate in and validate the findings of the staff team. Among other items, these include hierarchy charts and coding summaries.
In conclusion, the use of NVivo has permitted the OPTN to review public comments in a more systematic way that adds to the credibility, consistency, and trustworthiness of the analysis.


Sponsored by:


Applying the Socio-Ecological Model as a Framework for Qualitative Data Analysis in NVivo

Avantika Mathur-Balendra
Shudipta Islam
Nuzha Hafleen
Objective: The socio-ecological model (SEM) examines the dynamic interplay between individual, interpersonal, community, organizational and policy level factors impacting one’s health. This paper shares how NVivo was used to organize, merge and thematically analyze focus group data based on the SEM.
Background: There is an increasing prevalence of diabetes among South Asian (SA) adolescents reaching epidemic proportions. The dominant discourse in this racialized population has focused more on the impact of biological and behavioural factors (e.g. diet and exercise) than structural factors (e.g. employment and built environment). Photovoice, a participatory action research method, was used to examine SA adolescents’ reflections on diabetes risk, development and prevention in the SA community.
Methods: 15 SA adolescents attended 5 workshops focusing on the SEM and photovoice methodology and were asked to take 10 photographs in their communities to share their perspectives on diabetes. Participants discussed two photographs during focus group discussions. Transcripts were imported into NVivo, where thematic analysis was conducted based on individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and policy level factors.
Conclusion: Three researchers remotely collaborated to perform data analysis. To address challenges in the data analysis process, a customized protocol was created using NVivo and Google Spreadsheets to organize codes into the SEM framework, independently perform line-by-line coding, cross check each other’s work to maintain consistency in coding, and discuss findings collectively. Utilizing NVivo and the SEM as the framework to guide the analysis process proved to be extremely helpful in organizing, classifying and consolidating the codes and themes developed.


Sponsored by:


Secondary data and NVivo: Conducting qualitative analysis of comment sections from case files

Teresa Kline
This paper will discuss the creative use of NVivo to answer a research question based on secondary data not originally intended for this purpose. For this study, we are utilizing the comment sections from a purposive sample of 240 case files. These case files are created during the application process for a specific program (not identified in this paper), and the comment sections vary greatly in the length and level of detail provided. Additionally, the format of these case files is not optimized for NVivo upload and analysis. In this paper we will describe the selection of the purposive sample of 240 out of 4,000 case files, the general format and layout of the case file, the process for preparing and uploading the case files into NVivo, and a brief overview of our planned analytic approach. The focus of our presentation will be on flexibility that NVivo provides in conducting qualitative analysis of secondary data sources not originally intended for this use.

Sponsored by:


Addressing the Ethics of Conducting Virtual Qualitative Research in the Global South

Purbita Sengupta
Megan Douglas
The COVID-19 pandemic has presented new and significant ethical challenges to qualitative research methodologies. Without the possibility to undertake onsite fieldwork many researchers are now resorting to virtual research to accommodate physical distancing measures. This approach brings up important ethical questions and issues that the research community must address. Drawing from their own qualitative virtual research conducted during the COVID pandemic, the authors will address two ethical issues – power dynamics and privacy – and discuss mitigating strategies employed. The issue of power dynamics is discussed in terms of virtual interactions between Northern-based researchers and Southern-based participants. Field-based qualitative research has long been considered a way for researchers to reduce power differentials and promote participatory knowledge generation. As researchers increasingly shift to virtual methods, however, it is important to consider how researcher-participant relations are changing and what measures should be taken to limit power differentials while encouraging participatory methods. Next, the paper will consider the issues of access and privacy within virtual research. The challenges of global inequality of access to technology and Internet bandwidth, coupled with the patchwork of regulations and risks around cybersecurity, can pose significant risk to participant anonymity and confidentiality. Discussion will apply a post-colonial lens, arguing that it is important to consider the positionality of researchers vis-à-vis research participants who are based in the Global South in the research design and ensure participants’ autonomy is safeguarded at all stages of the research.

Sponsored by:


Virtual Focus Groups and Collaborative Coding

Kristen Carlson

Virtual, video conferencing software allowed for a pilot study of teacher educators to further understand how these novice educators and partner school principals define and measure teacher effectiveness. The qualitative portion of this pilot study, utilized phenomenology methodology to work on developing focus group interview protocols for use with Teacher Preparation program completers and their supervisors at a midsized, midwestern public university. Utilizing technology such as e-mail, video conferencing, transcription, and qualitative analysis software, the pilot study was able to include first- and second-year teachers and their principals in an easily accessible manner, that was both convenient for the researcher, research assistant, and participants. After the focus group and interview sessions, the researcher assistant transcribed the material and both the researcher and research assistant coded response themes and body language/facial expression themes utilizing the video conferencing recordings. This paper describes the methods utilized to select the sample of participants, preparation of the interview protocol and focus group etiquette material, and collaborative analysis utilizing the output from the technological softwares. Additionally, it briefly addresses the perceptions to the participants' experiences in a virtual focus group and their experience over the course of a chaotic academic year: the participants' first- or second- year of teaching and the COVID-19, distance learning experience.


Sponsored by:


Using Team NVivo in Collaborative Community-Academic Research Partnership

Shamiram Zendo
Amy Lewis
Naji Naeemzadah
Katherine Salter
Marlene Janzen Le Ber

Mobilizing Narratives for Policy and Social Change is an ongoing research project exploring how community-based organizations and research initiatives use narrative methodologies to generate policy or social change. The collaborative, community-academic partnership is structured into four broad thematic groups: (a) poverty and inequality, (b) meaningful and sustainable work, (c) discrimination, marginalization, & violence, and (d) legacies of colonialism. Each subgroup has created a working group comprising community and academic members that participate in all aspects of study development and execution.
Our study selected Team NVivo to support the analysis of multiple cases within and across (n=24) case studies. Given the size and scope of the current project and the demands for collective and partnered analysis and interpretation, Team NVivo was considered ideal; however, there has been multiple methodological challenges in implementation. The Mobilizing Narratives partnership is using Team NVivo to analyze a large quantity of data. The program has a number of benefits, such as remote access to the data, which is particularly helpful during a pandemic such as COVID-19; however, there are also challenges that have been exacerbated as a result of the pandemic. Community partners, academics, and students reported on challenges in using the program, such as frequent crashing issues with home internet bandwidth connection and added cost to the project as a result of purchasing server space.
To conclude, Team NVivo has immense potential in supporting remote research work that involves large partnerships. We hope that our presentation on the benefits and challenges of using Team NVivo in a community-university research collaborative will demonstrate its utility and areas for refinement.


Sponsored by:


When Photographs Are Your Big Data: Visual Rhetorical Analysis With NVivo

Marcela Ziede
While visual rhetorical analysis has been conducted on a limited number of artefacts so far, the paper aims to describe how a large number of photographs as artefacts can be used as big data through NVivo 12 Plus. Drawing upon Roland Barthes’ semiology theory of photography, a methodological design is described through a first and second order analysis followed by visual rhetoric. The preliminary elaboration of big data files enables to create the NVivo project and then a three-phase process of categorical, connotative, and rhetorical combining mixed methods of a priori coding and free coding procedures of interpretation is conducted. The project is integrated by units of analysis (photographs) and the codebook containing the definition of codes, memos of decisions adopted which enable the management of hierarchical code trees, a matrix of analysis, a cross tab, queries, and the visualization of data, among other tools. The researcher, using grounded theory, raises main themes as patterns of rhetorical communication and then articulates them through interpretative theoretical logics. This design is described for a single case study of a large company using photographs included in its two decades of corporate reports. Researchers interested in visuality embracing an interpretive paradigm can benefit from this comprehensive methodological design to explore research questions using new lenses and big visual data in fields that are not restricted to the communicational genre of corporations’ reports.

Sponsored by:


The Boom of Zoom During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Moving Qualitative Research Interviewing Online

Lisa Gray

The Boom of Zoom During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Moving Qualitative Research Interviewing Online
Lisa M. Gray, Ph.D. student, University of Alberta, Faculty of Education Gwen Rempel, Ph.D., Athabasca University, Faculty of Health Disciplines Gina Wong, Ph.D., Athabasca University, Faculty of Health Disciplines Karen Cook, Ph.D., Athabasca University, Faculty of Health Disciplines
During these unprecedented times in the COVID-19 era, individuals feel tremendous pressure and stress to adapt and survive during a pandemic. On a global scale, the way we access services, engage in entertainment, socialize, and function at our employment has changed dramatically. As a result, many taken-for-granted activities must be re-evaluated, in the interest of public safety and wellbeing. This certainly is the case for researchers who need to adapt the way they conduct research in this uncertain and ever-changing landscape. For qualitative researchers, whose mainstay of data generation is in-person interviewing; being nimble and thinking outside the box to virtual qualitative interviewing is crucial. Qualitative researchers are searching for new ways of generating data and may be at a choice point with a variety of new online platforms to consider. Qualitative researchers find themselves pressured to navigate the digital world.
To further expand the available resources, we present our experiences of utilizing Zoom Inc. for data generation in our published study about parenting. In this methodological focused presentation, we provide recommendations for best practices and describe research participants’ reactions to participating in virtual ZOOM Inc. research interviews. We also highlight the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing Zoom and describe how Zoom has adapted, increasing security features to meet security requirements for virtual qualitative data generation.
Keywords: Video Conferencing, Virtual Interviewing, Online Interviewing, Data Generation, Qualitative Research Methodology, Zoom Video Communications


Sponsored by:


Break

Silvana di Gregorio
View Posters and Vendors in the Exhibition Hall
Network in SIGs in the Chat Lounge
Look out for Sponsors’ and Vendors’ presentation sessions


NVivo Demo: Autocoding using existing coding patterns

Silvana di Gregorio
Demo on how to use Autocoding using existing coding patterns.

Sponsored by:


NVivo Transcription - Integrate with NVivo for faster analysis

Stacy Penna
Learn how NVivo transcription can be your automated transcription assistant, allowing the researcher the freedom to focus on the analysis.  Since NVivo transcription integrates with NVivo software, you can start analyzing your transcription data faster.

Sponsored by:


NVivo Demo: Autocoding to identify themes

Silvana di Gregorio
Demo showing how to do autocoding by themes

Sponsored by:


NVivo Demo: Autocoding to identify sentiment

Silvana di Gregorio
Demo showing how NVivo can be used to identify sentiment

Sponsored by:


Discourse Analysis in Discussion Forums: Science Teachers in Online In-Service Teacher Education Cou

Ricardo Henrique Pucinelli
Discourse Analysis in Discussion Forums: Science Teachers in Online In-Service Teacher Education Course Discuss the History of Evolutionary Thinking
This research analyzed the 2nd offering (2011-2012) of the online postgraduate in Science Teaching, conducted by the Faculty of Education of the University of São Paulo, in partnership with the Department of Education of the State of São Paulo, entitled “Rede São Paulo de Formação Docente” (REDEFOR).
In this research, it was verified how the participants of discussion forums interact in a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) through techniques of qualitative and quantitative analysis. From the descriptive statistics studies, a group with eleven teacher-researchers for Social Network Analysis (ARS) was defined. ARS made it possible to characterize the interaction networks of the discussion forums by obtaining sociometric indicators to characterize the participants in the studied group.
In turn, the qualitative approach promoted the analysis of discursive interactions through NVivo in the debates held in the discussion forum whose theme addressed the history of evolutionary thinking. An analytical framework called “Rainbow” was adopted, which proved to be effective for obtaining and exemplifying the dialogical relationships established between the participants during the debates in the discussion forums. Finally, it was possible to verify that a mixed approach was useful to categorize and understand the discursive interactions of the analyzed group.


Sponsored by:


Collaborative Autoethnography: Analysis of Text Messages as Method

Lauren Beasley
Sam Bernstein

Autoethnography, which grew out of traditional ethnographic methodology studying culture through observation (Gobo & Molle, 2017), combines traditional ethnographic methods with autobiographical methods to move social science research away from the colonizing observation of others to the empowering observation of self to understand culture (Ellis et al., 2011). Dual autoethnography is a growing form of autoethnographic work that utilizes dual perspectives on the same experience to assemble a fuller understanding of a shared experience (Chang et al., 2012). In examining the experiences of being a graduate student with a serious mental illness (SMI) diagnosis, we analyzed our own text messages exchanges—one from the point of view of a friend and professional social worker (Lauren) and the other from the point of view of a PhD student with an SMI diagnosis (Sam)—utilizing thematic analysis and self-interviewing about our individual thoughts in sending and receiving the text messages. In this presentation, we will explore our experience utilizing this methodology and method. We will start with an overview of the growing literature on the use of dual autoethnography as a form of ethnographic research, and then will discuss how text message conversations offer a rich source of data.


Sponsored by:


Textual Analyses using NVivo on Thousands of Literature Records to Extrapolate Insight

K.M. Tahsin Hassan Rahit
Maja Tarailo-Graovac

Authors: K. M. Tahsin Hassan Rahit and Maja Tarailo-Graovac Affiliation: Departments of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Medical Genetics; and Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
Recently, we wanted to prepare and present a comprehensive view of the field of "genetic modifiers of Mendelian disorders." The literature available on the online databases was overwhelmingly high, thus posing a challenge to extrapolate insights. Going through all these documents was impractical. On the other hand, depending just on the query parameters of the online database was not a reliable method to get the trend. Therefore, we performed textual analyses on these documents and found NVivo to be the most appropriate tool for our case. We started by defining our analysis objectives and designed query patterns accordingly. We searched online databases and exported all the different search results in .bib files. To combine, remove duplicates, standardize .bib files and extract the documents (pdf files) from online, we used JabRef. Next, we imported the bibliography, including the documents in an NVivo project. Then we applied multi-level cross-set textual queries on the documents. We utilized annotation, restrictive, and proximity-based textual queries, level of word modification, cross-code/set queries (Figure S1 of [1]). To increase reliability, we used a threshold value of 3 for the coding references. Lastly, we exported the lists of documents with different codes and prepared trend analyses and graphs from the exported lists [1]. Here, we have presented our comprehensive textual analysis of thousands of literature records to produce a comprehensive view of a field. The utilization of such techniques in a systematic review could potentially improve the quality of analyses. [1] doi: 10.3390/genes11030239


Sponsored by:


Conducting Virtual Qualitative Research on Sensitive Topics: Challenges and Opportunities

Megan Douglas

Qualitative methods, such as interviews or focus group discussions, are widely accepted to be a suitable approach for researching sensitive topics. Traditionally these approaches have been done via face-to-face interaction, as in-person exchanges of information enable a rapport-building process crucial for establishing trust between researcher and participant. The COVID-19 pandemic has required researchers to reconsider their qualitative data collection methods. With in-person interviews no longer possible, interactions must move to virtual platforms. Such a change brings with it new challenges and opportunities. Interviews conducted over the phone or through computer mediated communication (CMC), such as email, Skype, or text, can challenge the rapport-building process. As well, there are important ethical challenges associated with virtual methods, including issues of informed consent and data security. However, there are also benefits; virtual methods can be well suited for sensitive topics, with many participants feeling more comfortable disclosing personal information virtually than if they were face-to-face with a researcher. This paper examines the author’s virtual qualitative methodology (semi-structured interviews via Skype and online surveys) for a research project that examines access for mental health supports among social science researchers in the global South. It explores the methodological and ethical challenges encountered, mitigation strategies, and a discussion of how virtual qualitative research is creating new opportunities for access and meaningful data surrounding sensitive subject matter.


Sponsored by:


Using NVivo to Analyze Tweets of Violence Events that came to Trending Topics in Brazil

Luciano Fischborn
This paper presents the methodological procedures used on research about violence events with great repercussions on Twitter in Brazil using NVivo 12 Pro. From a mixed-method approach, this work focuses on the dimensions of opinions about punitivism and moral emotions, considering that studies that employ sentiment analysis or opinion mining have mistakenly assumed 'stance' and 'feeling' as equivalent. Despite the native extension NCapture is more practical, both in collect, import and analyze on NVivo, unfortunately, the relevant metric of likes is not captured, only the retweets. The data of an event of kidnapping occurred in August 2019 on the Rio-Niterói Bridge was collected with a script on RStudio, and the dataset needed to have a treatment to be imported on NVivo, divided into two parts. The map of codification on each part was formed by Opinion, Information, and Spam as primarily coding nodes, mutually excluding. The secondary coding nodes were the empirical categories under Opinion and one of these was 'Emotions', classified in each specific emotion in tertiary nodes. The 3907 tweets of the initial part were coded manually, probing sets of opinions, emotions, and words associated with them. The second part of 4433 tweets was coded based on the frequent words, that were less descriptive than before, indicating positions, the terms previously founded, and the rest was manually classified. In addition to these tools, Matrix Coding Query allowed to find which moral emotions were associated with categories that express punitivism (disgust), counter punitivism (indignation), and criticism towards the traditional news media (indignation).

Sponsored by:


Doing it HER way: the Baby Boomer female transition from Middle-age to Old-age

Sheila Gaasterland-Hebers
Baby Boomer women continue to influence society as they have in the past through the Feminist and Civil Rights Movements of the 1960s and 1970s. Barrett and Toothman (2012) noted in their 20-year longitudinal study that Baby Boomer women were elongating time spent as middle-aged women. Also, the female participants were achieving greater acceptance of their older self around the age of 70. The problem was not knowing what was occurring during the elongation of middle-age nor what strategies women adopt to cope or thrive during this phase of life.
This study used the interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), a qualitative research method to explore in-depth, the female, Baby Boomer experiences' transitioning from middle-age to old-age. The recruitment of the 11 Baby Boomer participants was by the use of the snow-ball effect until data saturation. The results from the thematic analysis revealed a 3-phase aging process occurring during middle-age for women as they develop both reactive and proactive strategies to maneuver through the aging transition. Baby Boomer women move into aging status unaware until the woman’s first aging event and are reactive in her coping/thriving strategies. As time pass, the middle-aged baby boomer is aware that she is aging by experiencing numerous aging events, such as menopause, caring for elderly parents, and retirement. The strategies include proactive as well as reactive approaches to maintain homeostasis, such as becoming more cautious when physically active so not to harm herself. When the Baby Boomer is in late middle-aged, she begins to accept her aging status. She experiences an acceptance of her physical body and prepares for personalized aging strategies.
The data provided a diverse list of strategies clustered into three themes: Support (health, financial resources, and social relationship), Bucket List (unfinished projects, goals, and dreams), and Wisdom. Future researchers may look closely at the psychological impacts the aging influences, including ageism and sexism. This study may be the foundation for therapeutic assessment and treatment for middle-aged women.


Sponsored by:


‘Student as Researchers’ Pedagogy and Qualitative Research

Ananya Banerjee
This presentation will highlight a study employing a qualitative grounded theory approach and an intersectionality framework funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). The purpose of the study is to explore experiences of migration and developing diabetes among immigrants from Sri Lanka living in the Greater Toronto Area of Ontario. We will describe how this qualitative inquiry has a strong emphasis on a ‘students as researchers’ pedagogy involving graduate students from Sri Lanka in framing research questions, generating or gathering data. Common intellectual experiences have formed this group research project, within and outside the curriculum, in mixed disciplinary groups. We demonstrate strong student engagement and formed a research team involving professors, junior staff, and graduate students working together. The project allows the principal applicants and co-investigators to work with and mentor students from Sri Lanka in a progressive way to support their academic and career development in the area of migration and health. Given, qualitative studies using a grounded theory approach generate rich and indispensable data with various emerging theoretical implications, students frame their own research question(s) and use the dataset to analyze, and write up and disseminate their findings through their voices as leading authors. Overall, students for this study, a strong emphasis has been placed on knowledge of the Tamil community, and qualitative interview experience. Having team members from the Tamil community with lived experiences of migration demonstrate commitment for engagement, translation and interpretation of the study materials, findings and knowledge mobilization.

Sponsored by:


Potentializing the Analysis of Qualitative Data with the Software’s Assistance: A Study on the Train

Vicente Sarubbi Jr
As pointed out by CAPES, in 2015 there were eleven doctoral programs in Public Health in Brazil with grades five, six and seven. In turn, doctoral guidance is a space of fundamental importance for the introjection of values, styles and academic culture. This paper checked consensus and diversity found in the representations of the advisors in relation to their contributions to the training of future PhD (professors-researchers) in Public Health. For this purpose, forty-five doctoral advisers were drawn for semi-structured interviews. The transcripts of the interviews were submitted to content analysis with the aid of the NVivo software. The process of interpreting and analyzing cross-reference tables made it possible to confront the demands of Public Health programs with the concepts of advisors on the training of PhD. The supervisors' conceptions were also compared according to the orientation time and in relation to the five, six and seven grades programs in the research sub-areas: health management and epidemiology, social sciences, and human sciences. Subsequently, the generated codes were submitted to a lexicometric analysis by the IRaMuTeQ software. This made it possible to parameterize the analyzes and showed possible convergences and divergences in relation to training expectations and contributions from the guidance of future PhDs in Public Health in the different doctoral programs in Brazil.

Sponsored by:


Electronic Portfolios: An Online Ethnographic Study

Rita Zuba Prokopetz

In this article, the author presents her exploratory ethnographic study where she examined peer- and self-reflection among master’s students as they completed their capstone ePortfolio projects in a fully online post-secondary institution in western Canada. These projects, developed both individually and in collaboration with peers, enabled students to engage in feedback-giving and feedback-receiving interactions at various stages of their ePortfolio development process. Through observations of interaction in the field site (online course) and participation in the community (Discussion Forum), this researcher engaged in a lengthy period of intimate study which enabled her to describe aspects of student interaction mediated by ePortfolios in an online learning community. Data were collected during three iterations of the capstone ePortfolio course using a mixed-method approach. Triangulation of data collection was established through surveying six students in a written questionnaire with closed- and open-ended questions and interviewing the same six students in semi-structured interviews of open-ended questions. Data were also collected from twenty-one archived student eportfolio presentations. This multitude of data sources necessitated the use of the software suite of NVivo tools to assist with the analysis of the data. Results on the perceived experiences of the students are contributing to the scholarship on online teaching and learning, further research on ePortfolio, and course revision. 
 
Keywords: ePortfolios, online ethnography, feedback interaction, peer- and self-reflection, NVivo tools
 


Sponsored by:


Using NVivo to Manage and Analyze Complex Data for a Grounded Theory Study

Avantika Mathur-Balendra
Natasha Kithulegoda
Nuzha Hafleen
Objective: Grounded theory is an iterative approach used to construct theory using systematic qualitative analysis of a given research area. However, data analysis for this method of inquiry can be complex and lengthy. This paper is a reflection on the usefulness of NVivo in the collaboration between members of a research team, and in organizing and analyzing complex qualitative data.
Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) disproportionately affects Tamil migrants from Sri Lanka. This population has a long history of civil and political conflict that uniquely shapes their patterns of migration. Research on how migration can contribute to one’s experience of T2DM is limited, thus this study explored experiences of migration and diabetes using a grounded theory approach and intersectionality framework.
Methods: Thirty semi-structured interviews were conducted, translated, transcribed and imported into NVivo for analysis using open and axial coding. Two researchers independently coded each transcript and then merged their files. Team meetings were held after every 2-5 interviews to organize hundreds of codes that emerged into overarching themes. This process allowed the team to reflect on the data, and organize hundreds of data points into concepts that enabled thematic analysis and theory development.
Conclusion: NVivo was successful in providing the research team a budget- and user-friendly means to organize and analyze large amounts of complex data. NVivo’s features allowed for collaboration with respect to organizing, merging and consolidating codes required for grounded theory construction. Valuable lessons from the data analysis process are shared to assist others considering using NVivo.


Sponsored by:


Supporting and Understanding Professional Development Needs Through COVID-19

Cindy Bogdan
Launched in 2019, the New Tech Network (NTN) quality assurance infrastructure was developed to provide a framework for evaluating and understanding the professional learning experiences of NTN educators and evaluate conditions for lasting change. New Tech Network provides professional development and learning to teachers at over 200 schools in the US. Surveys are used to gather participant experience data and feedback. Analysis examines the alignment among design, implementation, and experience with attention to gains over time. Essential in this analysis is the qualitative data participants provide around next steps, challenges, and essential drivers for change.
During the closures and during the transitions between closures due to Covid-19, NTN shifted the administration of workshops to a virtual setting to ensure a continuous flow of quality learning so that teachers and school leaders are supported and prepared to appropriately respond to the changing needs of their students and schools. The qualitative analysis of open-ended responses is essential in understanding the needs of the teachers and impact of the professional learning. The qualitative coding of survey responses from participants of previous workshops has been instrumental in ensuring that their feedback is utilized in the planning and facilitation of virtual training to ensure productive and engaging adult learning. The coding tools NVIVO offers enables a systematic procedure built on open, axial, and selective coding informed by grounded theory research.


Sponsored by:


Exploring the Support Networks of Those Caring for Loved Ones on Texas Death Row

Nicole Kinbarovsky
In 2018, Texas executed 13 offenders, more than all other states’ executions combined for the year. Currently, 212 offenders await execution on Texas death row. For every one person sentenced to die, estimated dozens more are affected. Research is limited but consistent on the impact on family and friends of those on death row; they suffer intense and complex grief with minimal to no support. This qualitative research study explores the support network(s) established by those who are actively caring for Texas death row inmates. The main research questions are: How do those caring for loved ones on Texas death row find the necessary support leading up to, during, and after the process of execution? What support is needed? How is support obtained, and what obstacles exist at different stages of the process? Data collection methods include participant observations, semi-structured interviews, and focus groups. The findings from the research are discussed in relation to previous research and the implications for policy and practice highlighted.

Sponsored by:


The constitution of the relevance of accounting services in the era of Covid-19

Julia Wu
An understanding of the external images of accounting firms and accountants is important to an appreciation of the roles of accounting services in a broader social context. The current study uses the virtual communications of top accounting firms in New Zealand to investigate how the relevance of accounting services are conveyed during the pandemic of Covid-19. As per the institutional theory, the legitimacy of the accounting profession have been largely grounded in the verbal and visual images of accounting services that are projected by accounting firms.
The research examines the communications of accounting firms on their official websites and various social media apps, namely Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Youtube, as responses to Covid-19 to explore the utilisation of virtual communications as advocates for their firms and services. The research aims to reveal the patterns and tactics, if any, of firms’ using social media apps to constitute and maintain the relevance of accounting services when both commercial activities and economic outlook are perceived to be low as a result of the pandemic.
Data are collected from official communications of top 30 accounting firms in New Zealand specifically referring to Covid-19 from January to July 2020. Qualitative data encompasses of texts, pictures and videos in the initial web articles, posts and twits and firms’ subsequent interactions with viewers. Quantitative data consisting of counts of views, followers, shares, reactions and comments will be obtained as of 31 July. Contents, thematic and discourse analyses are carried out with the assistance of Nvivo.


Sponsored by:


Collaborative Analysis

Kelsey Duebel
Our organization, PolicyWise for Children & Families, is a not-for-profit that strives to inform, identify, and promote effective social policy and practice to improve the well-being of children, families, and communities. One of the ways we work towards this mission is by conducting qualitative research in virtual multi-researcher teams. As with any qualitative research, ensuring rigour and quality is essential. Our response to this has been to create a framework to guide collaborative analysis. We have applied this framework consistently across many projects with numerous project managers and research and evaluation associates. The framework outlines methods and key focus areas for consideration as our teams move iteratively between stages of initial coding, identifying patterns, developing themes, and providing interpretation. Engagement with stakeholders and project sponsors is woven throughout the framework to help contextualize our deliverables. Through this approach, we emphasize both practice-informed evidence and evidence-informed practice. NVivo has been an indispensable tool to facilitate these methods throughout the entire analysis process. This presentation will focus on the rigorous and collaborative methods applied by our team using NVivo and this framework, resulting in high quality, contextualized findings. Examples from various projects will be used throughout the presentation to add concrete detail about the methods employed by our cross provincial teams.

Sponsored by:


‘Explaining it to the scientists’:Action research investigating what keeps youth engaged in physica

Jennie A. Petersen
James Mandigo
Although numerous movements that aim to increase participation in physical activity and sport have been initiated in recent years, youth physical activity levels continue to decline from childhood into adolescence. It is important to investigate pedagogical approaches that can support long-term youth engagement in physical activity and sport. Working ‘with’ youth to design programming based on their interests and needs can facilitate youth autonomy, competence and motivation in physical activity and sport settings. Using action research (AR), an approach where researchers and practitioners work together, we (a PhD student and her supervisor) have been working with youth 12-15 years, instructors and staff at a large urban YMCA to explore what pedagogical approaches are effective in helping youth stay engaged in physical activity and sport. This study was designed collaboratively with YMCA management and conducted with over 60 stakeholders, including youth and YMCA staff and volunteers. We are now in the third and final phase of this three year study, which was recently modified due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Action researchers are often deeply committed to creating social change, however, as noted in the literature, the challenges associated with navigating the power structures that facilitate opportunities for real change cannot be underestimated. This session will highlight the stakeholder engagement methods used throughout the different research phases to support enhanced organizational awareness of youth needs. We will reflect on the strengths and limitations of using AR, including its potential to challenge organizational pedagogies related to youth physical activity and sport programs.

Sponsored by:


An Oral Communication Approach to Media Literacy Analysis

Yupa Saisanan Na Ayudhya
My paper is an interdisciplinary study that develops an Oral Communication approach as a new qualitative research approach to critically analyze digital media communications and to understand how media affect patterns of thought of people and culture. This methodology is based on 1) the oral communication characteristics discussed in Ong’s (1982) Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word and 2) media literacy concepts discussed in Silverblatt et al.’s (2014) Media Literacy: Keys to Interpreting Media Messages. First, I built the coding frame by following the Process and Procedures of Qualitative Content Analysis (Flick, 2014, pp. 429-430, as cited in Schreier, 2014, p. 174; pp. 431-436, as cited in Mayring, 1983) to assign a final definition of the six media literacy categories that forms the core criteria of this approach based on theories discussed in Ong (1982) and Silverblatt et al. (2014) (Steinke, 2004, pp. 184-190). I then applied this methodology to a case study of ways in which President Donald J. Trump’s success can be attributed to his ability to exploit characteristics of Oral Communication through his campaign speeches and his tweets in a digital media environment.

Sponsored by:


Take off the blindfold and Understand: Sexual Violence Prevention: Providing Opportunities to Empowe

Martha Hernandez-Martinez
Take off the blindfold and Understand: Sexual Violence Prevention: Providing Opportunities to Empower and Support Latina Girls and Women in the Twin Cities
This proposal presents the method used in an outcome evaluation carried out with members of the Latino community in the twin cities in May 2020 using focus groups and individual interviews (Krueger, & Casey, 2002). Aiming to learn about the rules, policies and / or procedures and training offered to small Latino businesses, and employees to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace. Stakeholders included businesses owned by Latinos, rights advocacy organizations, regulatory bodies, development and training agencies, and Latino workers.
Method: We adapted an in-person facilitation process to a Zoom online platform, steps were taken to guarantee the security, confidentiality, and privacy of the participants (Forrestal, Valdovinos, & Vogel, 2015). Convenience and snowball criteria were used to select from the sample (Patton, 2002). An invitation was sent in an email that included a brief description of the project and the days in which the interviews would take place and the focus group, an estimate of the duration. We offered the alternative of calling us by phone if the participants had questions or concerns before accepting to participate.
Process: A question guide was used for each interest group. To obtain the consent of the participants, we sent the consent sheet and the questions in English and Spanish, for review and approval before the focus group and / or interview (Salmons, 2015). Participants received a letter of thanks and a sheet including a list of resources related to the topic.

 


Sponsored by:


Attempting rigour and replicability in thematic analysis of qualitative research data; a case study

Kate Roberts
Tony Dowell
Background: Navigating the world of qualitative thematic analysis can be challenging. This is compounded by the fact that detailed descriptions of methods are often omitted from qualitative discussions. While qualitative research methodologies are now mature, there often remains a lack of fine detail in their description both at submitted peer reviewed article level and in textbooks. As one of research’s aims is to determine the relationship between knowledge and practice through the demonstration of rigour, more detailed descriptions of methods could prove useful.
This presentation will detail the codebook development, previously published [1], which contributed to thematic analysis of qualitative data that formed part of a mixed methods multiphase design research project. This presentation is aimed at researchers and doctoral students new to thematic analysis by describing a framework to assist their processes. The detailed description of the methods used will support attempts to utilise the thematic analysis process and to determine rigour to support the establishment of credibility. This process will assist practitioners to be confident that the knowledge and claims contained within research are transferable to their practice. The approach described within this presentation will build on, and enhance, current accepted models.
1. Roberts K, Dowell A, Nie J-B. Attempting rigour and replicability in thematic analysis of qualitative research data; a case study of codebook development. BMC Med Res Methodol [Internet]. BMC Medical Research Methodology; 2019 [cited 2019 Apr 26];19:1–8. Available from: 10.1186/s12874-019-0707-y


Sponsored by:


Understanding the Impact and Benefits of Using Regular Zoom Writing Sessions for PhD Students During

Richard McGrath
Holly Bowen-Salter
Emma Milanese
Phoebe Pearce
Understanding the Impact and Benefits of Using Regular Zoom Writing Sessions for PhD Students During COVID-19: A Collaborative Autonetographic Approach.
During their candidature, PhD students experience social isolation, which can have a direct impact on their academic performance leading to some failing to complete their studies. Prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, the majority of HDR peer support groups (often developed as ‘writing groups’) have been established within individual universities and involve face-to-face sessions. However due to the physical distancing restrictions required to manage the spread of Covid-19, several online HDR writing support groups have been established which dissolve institutional and discipline barriers.
This study is exploring the impact and benefits of a regular, online writing support group using Zoom as a result of Covid-19. This study has drawn from two emergent qualitative methodologies: collaborative autoethnography and netnography. Due to the nature of the online writing sessions developing as a Community of Practice whereby members supported and encouraged each other with completing self-identified writing outcomes, the adoption of an online collaborative research methodology was deemed the most appropriate approach. To our knowledge, this is the first time collaborative autoethnography and netography have been combined.
Data collection involved participants writing personal reflections of the impact and benefits they perceive occurred in relation to their involvement in the online writing sessions. Reflection stories were collated and distributed to all participants to review. Participants were then encouraged to discuss the heuristic commonalities across the stories to identify themes during a regular Zoom session. Participants comments in the Zoom ‘chat’ function were also collated and analysed to assist with triangulation of heuristic commonalities.


Sponsored by:


Welcome and Overview of the Conference

Chris Astle
Silvana di Gregorio
Stacy Penna
Chris Astle, CEO of QSR International opens the conference with a Welcome to all presenters and attendees. Silvana di Gregorio, QSR's Research Director and conference co-organiser, gives an overview of the papers, posters and panel submitted for the conference. Stacy Penna, QSR's Community Director and conference co-organizer, gives a tour of the virtual conference platform.

Sponsored by:


Break

Stacy Penna
View Posters and Vendors in the Exhibition Hall
Network in SIGs in the Chat Lounge
Look out for Sponsors’ and Vendors’ presentation sessions


Ethics of Internet Research

Annette Markham
Doing social research while being physically remote from one’s field site or participants presents many challenges for qualitative researchers. This talk focuses on one aspect of this conversation: Ethics. In this talk, Professor Markham offers a framework of thinking of ethics through the lens of impact. She begins by tracing the history of ethics principles, as these have transformed from ideas to norms to regulations around social research. She argues that while extant regulations and laws form important guidelines for making ethical decisions in research design, they often fail to address the complexities of digital situations. While not the primary focus of the talk, Annette sketches some of the ways that digital, versus face to face research, can raise different ethical conundrums. She emphasizes that it is important for qualitative researchers to recognise the limitations of regulatory or top down guidelines and take steps to be proactive in development of research designs and practices that go above and beyond standard norms. Taking an impact approach, Professor Markham suggests, enables us to think reflexively about how our everyday tools and techniques of qualitative research have varying types of impact. While some actions might impact people directly, our research has impact in other, often less direct ways, through unintended side effects, use of data for other purposes than originally intended, downstream effects, and long-range future impact of our research. Markham’s talk emphasizes that these other ‘impact arenas’ should also be a part of our ethical thinking.

Sponsored by:


Break

Stacy Penna
View Posters and Vendors in the Exhibition Hall
Network in SIGs in the Chat Lounge
Look out for Sponsors’ and Vendors’ presentation sessions


Mobiles and Mandatory Alerts: A Study of Amber Alerts and Canada’s Emergency Alert System

Monique Lynn
A rising number of emergency events has led governments worldwide to advance notification systems to better inform the public during crises. In 2018, the Canadian Government incorporated wireless technology into their emergency system, Alert Ready, allowing authorities to mass distribute emergency notifications to mobile phones. Amber Alerts were included in this system, making Canada the first nation to send non-optional Amber Alerts to private devices. Amber Alerts are issued when a child has been abducted or is believed to be in imminent danger, and seek to gain the public’s help in recovery efforts.
This project uses online and virtual methods to investigate the public’s response to Amber Alerts distributed via Alert Ready. This includes using Google Trends data to align the distribution of an online survey and the collection of Reddit data with Canadian Amber Alert events. Reddit posts are used to explore the public’s lived experience of Amber Alerts in Canada, as they naturally occur, and in response to real events.
Analysis combines traditional thematic analysis approaches with Leximancer automated concept mapping. This helps to identify and interpret both semantic and latent themes and patterns across a large and diverse social media dataset, with content consisting of text, images, and hyperlinks to external websites. Through exploring attitudes towards this system, this project seeks to investigate whether the discourse that “everything” should be done to save a child’s life prevails in the face of resistance to intrusive systems and potentially ineffective crime control initiatives.


Sponsored by:


Aged Care Residents’ Prioritisation of Care: A Mixed-Methods Study

Kristiana Ludlow
While previous research has established aged care residents’ preferences for their care, i.e., what aspects of care are desirable to them, no study has explored residents’ views on care prioritisation, i.e., what aspects of care are most important to them. This study aimed to address this gap by investigating what aspects of care residents prioritise, how they prioritise care and influences on their prioritisation decision-making. Participants were 38 residents from five residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Participants completed a card sorting activity using Q methodology where they rank ordered 34 cards, each representing an aspect of care, from least to most important on a pre-defined grid. Concurrently, they verbalised their decision-making processes via a think-aloud task. They then completed post-sorting interviews, and semi-structured interviews focused on their experiences of prioritisation. Participants’ completed card sorts were analysed using inverted factor analysis techniques using PQMethod, resulting in the identification of four factors. Each factor represented a shared viewpoint. NVivo was used to facilitate inductive content analysis of participant transcripts to create rich narratives of each viewpoint. Each narrative provided insights into what types of care were prioritised by represented participants, and how they prioritise care, using supporting participant quotes. Additional inductive content analysis of think think-aloud and interview data was conducted using NVivo to identify themes depicting influences on prioritisation decision-making. The study findings have implications for staffing ratios in residential aged care, person-centred care, the support of residents’ independence, and the quality and appropriateness of meals and food provided in RACFs.

Sponsored by:


Continuing to Care in the Time of COVID-19: Evaluation of a Communication and Service Delivery Progr

Libby Massey
Desireé LaGrappe
Aboriginal Australians from the remote Northern Territory who live with disabilities caused by Machado-Joseph Disease (a rare neurodegenerative disorder) and hearing loss were uniquely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Biosecurity area restrictions banned travel to minimise the risk of transmission in the initial response. Disability services typically operate a ‘fly-in fly-out’ model in these communities. Restrictions effectively cut the communities off from providers. This project aims to assess the impact of the restrictions and to improve access to timely, accurate and culturally informed information and services for this cohort to:
? Minimise deterioration in physical and mental health related to changed service delivery models;
? Maximise service delivery and research capacity that is accessible, prevention focused and addresses Aboriginal workforce needs;
? Inform future health care policy and service provision in post-acute COVID-19 phases.
The project, a telecommunication strategy for Aboriginal people, is based on diffusion of innovation and social network theories. The tailored strategy integrates results from the analysis of qualitative data from interviews and online focus groups with Aboriginal Disability Workers (ADW). The purpose is to discuss general and video communication preferences, a hallmark of working during COVID-19, and to trial preliminary strategies, tools and aides with ADWs prior to roll-out within the communities. The study includes an evaluation to compare pre-COVID-19, pre-project and post-project data. Additional data sources include: program data of the MJD Foundation, and the Kessler-5 survey to measure psycho-social distress. This paper will discuss in more detail the qualitative methods of the research study.


Sponsored by:


The Development Of A Qualitative Data Collection App For Real Time Audio And Video Recordings

Hazel  Keedle

Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of women planning a VBAC in Australia. The method of data collection was not clearly understood as standard methods such as interviews and focus groups did not address the issues of how women were feeling after every antenatal appointment. Through this dilemma the idea of a specific smartphone application designed to obtain video or voice diary entries was developed.
Method: The design and development of ‘myVBACapp’ was achieved between the PhD candidate and an external app developer. The data once collected was transcribed and narrative analysis used. An evaluation survey exploring ease of use of the ‘myVBACapp’ was undertaken by participants of the study.
Results: MyVBACapp scored highly on all aspects of ease of use and the data obtained from the app has been both rich and unique in content. The app was improved and made available for qualitative researchers to use and is now called ‘Voqual’. A further three studies are now using Voqual for their qualitative data analysis.
Conclusion: The design and development of ‘myVBACapp’ was a challenging but educational process for the phd candidate and research team. This novel way of data collection added important knowledge in understanding the experiences of women planning a VBAC in Australia. The app has now been adapted to be used in other qualitative research projects.


Sponsored by:


Developing a Qualitative Mapping Method: Gamers and Ex-gamers of Wizards Unite and Pokémon Go, Level

James Smith
Kathleen Yin
Matthew Lee
Louise A. Ellis
Kiran Ijaz
Developing a Qualitative Mapping Method: Gamers and Ex-gamers of Wizards Unite and Pokémon Go, Levels of Specialisation, Constraint, Involvement, and Loyalty
James Smith, 1 Kathleen Yin, Matthew Lee, Louise A. Ellis, Kiran Ijaz
Correspondence to: James Smith: Research Fellow, Centre for Healthcare Resilience and Implementation Science, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Level 6, 75 Talavera Road, North Ryde, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.
Email: jim.smith@mq.edu.au; Tel: +61 2 9850 2417.
Background Augmented Reality (AR) for use on smartphones has the potential promise to improve health outcomes thus transforming gaming as a sedentary leisure pursuit to an active leisure pursuit having physical, psychological and social implications. While the question of AR games on long-term health outcomes is still under debate, one question has remained largely ignored by marketers and producers of AR games, and that is what sustains different gamer loyalty in the complexity of their leisure world, and why do some individuals choose to quit playing whereas others are able to resolve constraints with minimal effort to continue their leisure pursuit? We aim to develop a qualitative method to map gamers and ex-gamers of Wizards Unite and Pokémon Go based on their level of specialisation, constraint, involvement, and loyalty.
Method Data were collected through an online Qualtrics survey using convenience sampling. The survey was posted on four subreddit forums dedicated for Wizards Unite and Pokémon Go for two weeks and obtained completed answers from 1052 participants. Our new qualitative mapping method aligns with a deductive category application, coding all highlighted excerpts in NVivo 12 Plus using a predetermined coding scheme based on the combined leisure and consumer behaviour coding framework.
Results and Conclusion Constraints can negatively influence loyalty whereas activity involvement acts to sustain gaming across different gamer groups and should not be underestimated as a powerful influence in decision-making, choice behaviour, behaviour change and ultimately loyalty to the brand.


Sponsored by:


Mental Health Nurses' Attitudes, Empathy and Caring Efficacy Towards Consumers With Dual Diagnosis:

Roopalal Anandan
Mental Health Nurses' Attitudes, Empathy and Caring Efficacy Towards Consumers With Dual Diagnosis: A mixed-method study
In psychiatric-mental health settings, dual diagnosis is a term used to explain co-existing mental health and alcohol/drug problems (co-morbidities) that can occur in the same person simultaneously (World Health Organisation, WHO, 2010). Social discrimination, negative attitudes, and stigma of consumers with dual diagnosis are widely held among mental health clinicians, and these consumers are more stigmatised than those with any other health problems (Livingston, Milne, Fang, & Amari, 2012). We performed a scoping review to systematically map the available literature regarding mental health nurses’ attitudes, empathy, and caring efficacy towards consumers with co-existing mental health and drug\alcohol problems. This review yielded twenty articles. We used NVivo™ Version 12 Plus to analyse the extant literature. Auto coded themes were identified and grouped into conceptually similar items. Twenty studies were reported outcomes regarding nurse attitudes; however, none reported nurses’ empathy or caring efficacy towards consumers with dual diagnosis. This presentation delivers a brief overview of the experiences of the author, and a brief account of the challenges encountered while using NVivo™ Plus for analysing scoping review.


Sponsored by:


Midwives providing woman-centred care during the COVID-19 pandemic

Virginia Stulz

Aim: The aim of this national research is to explore midwives’ views and perceptions about their experiences about how COVID-19 has impacted on their ability to provide woman-centred care. 
 
Method: Each research member distributed a flyer and an expression of interest was also sent out via the Australian College of Midwives to members and also via their Facebook page which captures non-members. All investigators also administered via their own administrated Facebook pages to midwives that work within their state. The expression of interest was a link that took the midwife to a survey on the Qualtrics platform that asked them about their demographics. This Qualtrics response was sent to the Chief Investigator’s Qualtrics site so that the researcher can evaluate who to invite to an in-depth interview to ensure representativeness from each of these cohorts across diverse groups. The midwife after expressing an interest in participation is provided an information and consent form by the researcher by email. If consent is provided, he or she is contacted by phone or email to organize an in-depth interview that is being audiotaped and transcribed verbatim and is being analysed using thematic analysis.
 
This is a qualitative, descriptive, exploratory study. Purposive sampling has been used to recruit midwives involved in different models of care and at different stages of career will be included, for example, new graduates, senior midwives, hospital shift midwives, midwives working in caseload and midwifery group practice models across all areas of maternity that include antenatal, birthing and postnatal areas. 
 


Sponsored by:


An Investigating Social and Economic Issues and Prospects of Managing The Pandemic COVID-19 Using a

Dyah Gandasari
New pneumonia, which started in Wuhan, has quickly spread to more than 190 countries. It is known as Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and has caused a global crisis in many countries, including Indonesia. It has not only resulted in health but also had a wide social and economic effects. Furthermore, media articles about COVID-19 are considered as an important, source of information for the knowledge process and the formation of public opinion. Therefore, since the media provides and creates information on related topics, the impact on social and economic activities are also discussed. The study examines the roles of online news in analyzing social and economic problems using qualitative and quantitative content analysis. Furthermore, NVivo 12 tool was used to determine the number of news by dividing the problem types. Data were collected from 28 February 2020 to 8 April 2020, and the samples consisted of 6,376 from Antara news as an online media platform. The results show that the interim news reported on social and economic impacts, and out of 6,376 information items about 29% and 42% were related to social and economic activities respectively. The topics addressed to the community due to social issues include regulations and policies, social funds and charity, educational information & humanities. Furthermore, the stock exchange, as one of the news topics is related to economic problems, transportation, and tourism industries.

Sponsored by:


Break

Silvana di Gregorio
View Posters and Vendors in the Exhibition Hall
Network in SIGs in the Chat Lounge
Look out for Sponsors’ and Vendors’ presentation sessions


Improving Research Team Collaboration with NVivo

Stacy Penna
The presentation will share tools for how to manage NVivo projects among team members, track decisions, as well as compare and view coding across team members. See how NVivo can support your team to collaborate effectively together on a research project.

Sponsored by:


Statworks Vendor Presentation: Literature Review using NVivo

Statworks Group
Vendor presentation by Statworks who are based in Malaysia.

STATWORKS has extensive experience in implementing Data Science and Analytics Solutions in various organizations. By using our solution, organizations in various industries can reduce costs, improve performance, and gain the agility to respond to changing business needs. STATWORKS expertise is in working with large volumes of data and running algorithms where smarter data science computing with or without coding has become the core of our customers’ analytical journey. 
 
Statworks is leading company concentrating on computational analytics. 2 decades in the evolving market for solutions on computational analytics technology. this is our range of solutions and services which is analytical solutions, education technology, data science platform and AI and machine learning.
We providing variety of solution that concentrate on solving Big Data Analytics, Data Science and education technology. Product that Statworks provide solution: IBM Analytics Solutions, TIBCO Analytics Solutions, DataWalk, ArcGIS. Meanwhile for education technology is Texas Instruments, IBM Data Science dan Machine Learning, NVivo, Eviews and TIBCO Statistica.


Hakkim Azlan demonstrates how NVivo can be used in a literature review.



Sponsored by:


Employing Constructivist Grounded Theory Method to evaluate projects ‘real’ success

Johan Fahri
Organizations have been massively investing their resources to deliver their strategic objectives. Projects are then used as building blocks to realize those objectives. Project management literature acknowledges that project success should be measured at three different stages: output, outcome, and impact stages. Evaluation of projects at the outcome and impact stages identify long term benefits and demonstrate a project’s real success and evaluation of outputs at project completion cannot. While many studies have shown ways on how to measure the success of project, limited studies have done it for the outcome and impact stages, especially when the success are perceived differently by different stakeholders at different stages. Ex-Post Project Evaluation (EPPE) has being proposed to evaluate project success at the post-handover stage. This paper emphasizes the of constructivist grounded theory method (CGTM)—which has been presented at the 9th ACSPRI Social Science Methodology Conference in 2016—under the EPPE approach. Instead of discussing the results—where were able to identify convenience, development, documentation, maintainability, new capability, price of service or product, training, and usability as critical success factors,—this paper highlights two important methodological findings: 1) processing of translating during the code as a part of constant comparative analysis and 2) the use CGTM in Ex-Project Post Evaluation (EPPE).

Sponsored by:


E-Satisfaction and Online Learning Experiences in a Public Sector Higher Education Institutes (HEIs)

Sana Akhtar

With the escalation of pandemic latitude educational institutes around the globe had to make a shift in their institutional ideology from regular to online. Despite numerous challenges, Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) in Pakistan had to paved ways to adopt digital teaching and learning approaches for their institutes. Though, knowing that confined budget do not help much public sector HEIs were being directed to embrace same online policies for the sake of their academic activities and reputation as other private sectors’ HEIs are smoothly following. Alongside of limited funding resources it is not easy to maintain educational activities with all quality elements, hence quality serves as one of the benchmark of satisfaction.
So, the following study is used to explore satisfaction of students towards their online learning programs. A qualitative case study was designed. For methods, triangulation was made and In-depth interviews and observation processes were selected. Interview questionnaire was based on factors related to service quality and interviews were conducted by phone calls. While for observations students’ whatsapp groups were created as an alternate for online bulletin boards. Through purposive sampling 15 students were selected as sample from the Department of Special Education. Feedback from students used to chalk out gaps in the system and make necessary modification in the andragogical process.
Key words: e- satisfaction, public sector higher education institutes, online learning


Sponsored by:


NVivo Bridging Grounded Theory and PLS-SEM: a Mixed-Methods Study of Leadership Development

Mengye Yu
Fangting Yu

Mixed-methods research may involve various mixes of qualitative and quantitative approaches, such as methodology, data collection, and analysis techniques. The findings of mixed-methods studies can be reinforced through combining exploration of meanings and explanation of variables’ relationship. Transforming qualitative information has been utilized in mixed-methods studies to determine statistical validity, such as t-test and ANOVA. Yet, PLS-SEM (Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling) has not been reported of utilizing transformed data.
This study demonstrates how to conduct a mixed-methods study by following the author-designed 7-Step Mixed-Methods Framework of Grounded-Theory& PLS-SEM approaches. This study integrates grounded theory (GT) and PLS-SEM analysis by NVivo. GT analysis focuses on understanding how and why vicarious learning impacts on leadership development; whereas, PLS-SEM analysis is to test this grounded theoretical framework emerged from GT. The software NVivo 12 facilitates the GT analysis and transforms the qualitative result into quantitative data. PLS-SEM analyzes the transformed data with SmartPLS software and finds there is a significant relationship between challenging experience and leadership development. Through bridging grounded theory and PLS-SEM analysis with NVivo, this study broadens mixed-methods research methodologically. It strengthens the statistical reliability of a qualitative study by employing PLS-SEM and transformed data. The author-designed 7-Step Mixed-Methods Framework of Grounded-Theory& PLS-SEM can practically assist other mixed-methods studies. Furthermore, the novel blended mixed-methods approach may encourage more methodological attention.
Keywords: NVivo, Grounded Theory, PLS-SEM, Mixed Methods, Leadership Development


Sponsored by:


Online Mediums for Research and Learning: Experiences of Facilitators and Participants in an Online

Maryanne Pais
In the present context, there is a need to deliver various forms of content using online or virtual mediums. The present study aims to understand the experiences of facilitators and participants who were a part of an online life skills training program in a college in Bangalore, India. The study explores the positive and negative aspects of conducting activity and experiential based programs online, and highlights the various challenges experienced by both the facilitators and participants. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Content analysis was carried out using NVivo software in order to explore common perspectives and experiences. As a further analysis, the participants’ experience of being interviewed was also recorded and analysed. In addition, a comparative analysis of the researchers’ previous experience of conducting face-to-face interviews and conducting online interviews helped highlight differences between these two mediums. Based on the analysis, the experiences and challenges of online life skills training and interviewing have been emphasized. This includes the digital gap between urban and rural areas in India, and personal preferences for face-to-face or virtual contact. Based on this analysis, recommendations that may help improve the delivery of content, and the conducting of research via online and virtual mediums have been made.

Sponsored by:


Using NVivo to Identity Change in Social Representations Over Time in Qualitative Analysis of Text M

Chelsea J. Mullens
Using NVivo to Identity Change in Social Representations Over Time in Qualitative Analysis of Text Media
Social representations, which are the depictions used to communicate about an unfamiliar object in a familiar and relatable way, are typically explored using interviews and focus groups. Doing so captures the ideas of participants at a single point in time with some scope for participants to reflect on the past, which can present limitations that are also shared by media analysis. However, coding mass media for social representations through NVivo across an extended timeframe overs a longitudinal sample of the same source that can identify depictions about a topic and changes in those over time. A key challenge of coding extensive samples of text media to identify representations of particular objects through NVivo is being able to code in a way that enables easy organisation of codes into emerging themes. Using a study of mass media discussion of solar energy in Australia during a fifteen year period as an example, this paper illustrates how to code for social representations in text sources over an extended timeframe using inductive coding.
This paper shows one way that NVivo can be used to capture meaning over time by enabling themes to emerge from inductive open coding. In doing so, this paper provides further insight into inductive coding approaches to use NVivo to code for social representations over time. It offers a flexible way to code for emerging themes, particularly in instances where themes are not pre-determined and when the focus of analysis is the meaning within text.


Sponsored by:


Adapting photovoice for online use during times of disruption: Addressing issues of equity and inclu

Anna CohenMiller
Zhanna Izekenova
Photovoice is a participatory action research method allowing for hands-on interaction between lead researcher and participants. During "normal" times, photovoice allows for community development and deep meaning-making as individuals and a group. When normal times turn to those "of disruption," research likewise needs to change to address the needs of participants. This paper explores the use of photovoice--adapted for online use--to understand the experiences of mothers in higher education who also have children at home learning online, during COVID-19. In particular, this work addresses how the adaptation of photovoice for online use can speak to issues of equity and inclusion in higher education.

Sponsored by:


The Use of WhatsApp as a Qualitative Research Tool for Geographically Dispersed Samples

Rocio Bueno-Roldan

According to the World Migration Report 2020, in the world, there are around 272 million international migrants, representing about 3.5 percent of the total globe population. Modern life and globalization have also prompt an increase in international professional mobility (Gatti 2009; Bokyo 2004). Research then, has to keep up in its necessity to reach the international community while maintaining veracity. VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocols) can contribute to it, offering the possibility of voice calling and sometimes video-chat in a financially affordable manner anywhere in the world (Lo Iacono, 2016). The big question is, can the research community adapt the traditional methods of data collection to the use of internet and VoIPs while keeping rapport?
This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using WhatsApp as a tool for conducting qualitative interviews, specifically with geographically dispersed samples. It reviews the challenges of adapting video conference, audio phone call, audio message and written message WhatsApp options to the classic qualitative research methods. I conclude that WhatsApp, through its flexibility and informality, may be considered a valuable tool for qualitative research. Specifically, among groups who used it on a daily basis to communicate with friends and relatives worldwide (i.e. Expats). As one of the interviewees commented when asked if she liked this new kind of interview type. “Yes, the experience was very interesting and different. In the end, life has already become remote, so it is a question of adapting to the new.”


Sponsored by:


Perspectives on the UKs Chief Information Officer Role: A Comparison of Advertised UK CIO Job Role R

David Harding
Perspectives on the UKs Chief Information Officer Role: A Comparison of Advertised
UK CIO Job Role Requirements with CIO Assessment Literature


Organisations avoiding disruption from digital technologies are turning to their IT Leaders to establish new dynamic capabilities. Organisations reliant on their Chief Information Officers to exploit digital technologies must minimise conflicting CIO role perceptions, especially if they wish to reverse high-turnover rates and improve CIO performance. Adopting Organisational Role Theory, we capture CIO role perspectives from UK CIO job adverts and compare them to the body of knowledge. Through a process of word count, cluster analysis and auto-coding we identify frequently occurring phrases in our sample of job adverts that describe the role recruitment context and desired ‘attributes’ of prospect CIOs. On comparison to the body of knowledge, we find that UK recruiters, perceiving CIOs as IT Managers, emphasise previous status as a subjective indicator of knowledge and skill, whilst CIO researchers perceive CIOs as strategic leaders who exert influence using measurable attributes. We conclude that UK companies appear to be either avoiding digital technologies or have not turned to their CIOs to embrace and exploit them


Sponsored by:


Dealing with the Medium: Using Facebook Data in Qualitative Research

Cristine Dyhrberg Højgaard

Through observational online ethnography and online interviews, I studied a Facebook based network of ‘makers’ producing free-of-charge protection equipment during COVID-19. This paper discusses how the affordances (Gibson 1977) of the Facebook medium affect the research situation and how researchers might harvest the advantages and take a critical stance to the possible biases this creates. Some affordances are social in character, e.g. whether a Facebook group is open or not, while others are determined by the digital architecture, like the max. amount of keystrokes on twitter. Social media is thus a setting that both displays the interrelating in the network and possibly affect it. As such the paper takes the stance, that online and offline activity mutually influence each other (Baym & Boyd 2012).
The paper consists of three parts. The first covers some advantages, e.g. the use of Facebook for purposeful sampling of informants. The next section debates possible risks. It discusses the need for insight to how affordances might have shaped the online interaction, for instance through the possibility of administrators to end a thread. Following this, the possible shaping of the researchers own interpretation of the online interactions, as they played out, is scrutinized. For instance the lack of structure in Facebook led me to use the ‘pinned’ messages as a structuring element, thus giving the administrators’ perspective a stronger ‘voice’ in my research. The third part regards the ethics of online ethnography, discussing the potential use of data from observed online interactions in the interview situation.


Sponsored by:


The study of the use of digital media in Vietnamese political dissent

Hien Nguyen

?Introduction: Recently, the proliferation of digital media in Vietnam promises the possibility of having a virtual public space. It enables people to connect, communicate, and share their opinions on political issues with each other despite geographical distance. News media could potentially give Vietnamese citizens more opportunities to express their views in online public discussions over political concerns. These engagements in cyberspace could transfer into actions in physical space which is known as a collective action and challenge the Vietnamese government. Whether this advantage brought by new media could help to change the political discourse in Vietnam or not remains to be explored. Whether the virtual public sphere exists in Vietnam or not needs to be further studied.
Aims: 1) the nature of citizens’ engagement in public discussions of governance concerns on social networking sites in Vietnam;
2) the emerging likelihood of collective actions formed thanks to political participation in digital space in Vietnam;
3) news reported on cyber-activism and government responses on cyber-activism in mainstream media in Vietnam.
Methods Mixing quantitative and qualitative approaches with a combination of content analysis and discourse analysis have been adopted for this research I have analyzed 54,486 comments contributed by 33,470 participants on the chosen three cases, including Cutting Tree, Formosa, and Special Economic Zones.
Source: Data exported from Exportcomments.com for this study News articles captured by NCapture from the five established widely-read online news sites, namely Vnexpress.net, Tuoitre.vn, Dantri.com.vn, Tintuconline.com.vn, BBC.com.vn. I examined and analyzed 107 articles during this study.


Sponsored by:


The Use of Projective Techniques to Enhance the Online Interview Environment: Innovative Consumer Re

Samantha Read
The Use of Projective Techniques to Enhance the Online Interview Environment: Innovative Consumer Research in a Digital Age
This study examines consumers’ perceptions of their brand relationships in relation to digital self-extension through an innovative online approach to data collection. Semi-structured interviews from a sample of twenty Generation Z iPhone users were enhanced through digital projective techniques to access participants’ unconscious desires or conscious deep-seated beliefs, through the application of non-threatening stimuli. Following in-depth questions concerning participants’ branded Smartphone application use across a three-month period, each participant was provided with a scenario in which the three brands they previously identified as their favourite branded apps are positioned in a fictitious room, drawn and shared with the participants on the online platform Blackboard Collaborate Ultra. Participants were to imagine themselves in the room and given a series of prompts to reflect on their interactions with the three personified brands. By involving each participant in this constructive progress, participants expressed greater details concerning how they view their brand relationships than they did with standard questioning. This is further developed through expressive projective techniques to explore levels of Brand Engagement in Self-Concept (BESC) in a digital environment.
The data was coded and analysed via NVivo to draw out key themes emerging from the projections. This includes insights into perceived brand personalities, emotions expressed through the construction of the room events and conflicting attitudes surrounding digital brand relationships. The unstructured nature of the projective tasks furthermore increased the validity of the data collection by negating potential researcher bias, in addition to addressing interviewee fatigue by actively engaging the participants in content creation.


Sponsored by:


The Importance of Reflexivity in Remote Teams: Using NVivo to Bridge the Physical Divide

Anuja Cabraal
Christina Silver
A fundamental activity in qualitative and mixed-methods analysis is reflection. Throughout an analysis the plethora of thoughts we have about the data, the participants, the analytic process, the growing interpretations and so on, must be captured so they can be accessed at a later point to be built upon and developed into a valid and trustworthy account. Working in teams adds complexity to this process to ensure the reflections of all team-members are integrated. When face-to-face meetings are not possible, the task becomes more reliant on systematic processes to share, comment on and develop reflections. Capturing reflections can happen in a variety of ways in NVivo, which is one of the main benefits of using such a dedicated CAQDAS-package.
In this paper we discuss the ways NVivo can be used to capture and store written reflections, as well incorporating different methods used for reflections such as audio recordings, drawings/images and developing models. We discuss how they can be used by teams to foster systematic reflection whilst maintaining the flexibility for individual perspectives; and illustrate the value of using NVivo for capturing reflections when working remotely
Dr Anuja Cabraal & Dr Christina Silver


Sponsored by:


How NVivo Can Help Supervisors of Postgraduate Students

Helen Marshall
This paper has a practical focus. It begins with the argument that those responsible for helping postgraduates deal with their qualitative data find the task easier when they understand the ‘headnotes’ in the project- nuances of the research question and the student’s approach to it. The tradition of long discursive face-to-face meetings between student and supervisor helped grow mutual comprehension, but the growth of postgraduate numbers and increased time pressures made such meetings more difficult (and current conditions have made them impossible). Time pressures have also made it harder for supervisors to read and comment on multiple drafts of material. The paper first outlines the concept of headnote discusses ways in which it has been related to qualitative data . It comments briefly on the changing nature of the postgraduate experience, focussing on Australia. It then shows how NVivo offers ways to get at headnotes. The tools that are of use at the analysis stage are fairly simple ones, mainly those that display coding. These can be used even when the student is working with NVivo but the supervisor does not use the program. The paper also comments on the ways in which tools within NVivo may help supervisors to encourage reluctant writers to build the account of their research. While the paper takes the supervisor’s perspective, the suggestions made could easily be used by students who feel that their supervisors do not quite grasp the nuances of the PhD project.

Sponsored by:


The Role of Aesthetics and Symbolism on Luxury Brand Image: a Netnographic Study of an Online Brand

Saira Sultana
Andrina Halder
The aim of this paper is to build new knowledge on the role that visual aesthetic and symbolic components of luxury brands play in visual posts shared in an online community. Adopting a netnographic approach, a brand community interaction and life is observed. It allows full description of online social life that fits well in any online interaction, thus provided a realistic, interactive and immersive experience to the researcher. The data collected through online conversations and online Skype interviews of ‘The Purse Forum’ (TPF) community members are processed through a thematic analysis. A digital diary, separate node in Nvivo software, screenshots, and web-log have been maintained. It is to capture field notes and have been incorporated with non-participation observer data and interview data with photo elicitation to support the online, virtual methods and qualitative nature of this research. In this research, NVivo was used for thematic analysis that supported code-based inquiry, searching, and theorizing combined with ability to annotate and edit documents. Non-numerical, unstructured data and image content; these Nivivo features made it suitable for this research. The raw data coding and the sorted text were labelled through codes with the support of Nvivo. This research has provided an outline of how to present NVivo data in a comprehensive systematic manner that might be useful for any future research. Therefore, the process of analysis using NVivo as an integrative medium is a contribution to methodology that established an important gateway of online and virtual method.

Sponsored by:


Auto-Coding COVID-19 Press Conference Narratives: tools, opportunities, insights and datasets

Steve Wright
This session explores the potential of recent developments in qualitative analysis software for the rapid processing of emerging data - using data from the current COVID-19 pandemic and US government press conference transcripts. The focus is on the potential of the methods and tools for analysing political discourse. Additionally input and interest is sought for any potential research re-use from creating and sharing an open dataset either as part of a contemporary and emerging situation, and/or in the future as an archive if it.
The session will demonstrate and explain how software features in different Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS) can be used together to draw on different opportunities and tools in different packages via the QDA-Exchange format. Initially this required automatic detection and tagging of speakers in transcripts (available in ATLASti) and then exporting that data through the recently developed QDA exchange format to NVivo in order to use tools from NVivo Plus to run automated coding for sentiment and key topics. Approaches to onward data exploration, visualisation and various potential approaches to in-depth analysis will then be interactively explored. This is a work in progress so there will be a real focus on enabling opportunities to contribute and shape the developing dataset, share it for teaching and demonstration purposes as publicly available data and to input into, use, reuse or propose next steps in a project that is currently a testbed for methods development.


Sponsored by:


Digital Storytelling in Rural India: A toolkit for developing 21st century digital storytellers

Harshada Desai
A continuous struggle for pre-pandemic India has been to deliver quality school education across social strata. The pandemic has enhanced and further complexed the problem of education accessibility. As many students across the world make a shift to online education, we cannot ignore that many children in rural India have been set back as they are again unable to access education, due to lack of digital resources. In February 2020, before the nationwide lockdown in India, I had the opportunity to conduct a digital storytelling pilot in rural Bihar and Jharkhand. Two of India’s most disadvantaged geographies. The aim: to explore digital storytelling as a tool for digital literacy, developing 21st century skills and building digital identity for members of the Bal Sansad (Child Parliament).
The research was conducted in a workshop setting applying techniques of participatory action research. Before visiting the field, telephonic interviews and questionnaire surveys with teachers from the school and social work associates helped us to understand the context and to design an implementable intervention.
The paper will focus on the design of the research, and its implementation in a workshop format. It will also evaluate the outcomes, i.e.: digital stories created by students of the Bal Sansad and showcase the possibilities of using this pilot as a model to bring rural students to connect and participate in the wider world. The paper will further discuss the social impact of such a project during a pandemic and post.
Keywords: digital literacy, digital identity, rural students, 21st century skills, education, Participatory Research


Sponsored by:


Marrying NVivo with NodeXL: The Nexus for Qualitative Social Media Research

David Lomoywara
Robert Rukwaro Maina
Immaculate Tallam
Qualitative research has continued to revolutionize in recent years. Questions have been raised about the linkage between qualitative and quantitative research. In the present era, social media presents avenues where people can share sentiments, perceptions, stories, and engagements. Suffice to say; social media is abuzz with a lot of qualitative data. Some software like NodeXL has been used to mine social media data. Social media researchers wonder what to do with such rich data extracted from social media sites via NodeXL. NVivo can be creatively used to provide not only the quantitative content analysis given by some social media data harvesting software but also qualitative aspects of the data.
This paper focuses on creating a nexus for the rationale for the use of NVivo in doing a quantitative and qualitative content analysis of social media data. The paper presents marriage between NodeXL spreadsheet data, a social media data mining software, and NVivo to arrive at a hybrid social media data analysis procedure. NodeXL software mines data on social media sites such as Twitter using hashtags and keywords. Under the tweets section on NodeXL, the conversations around the topic of discussions are lined up. The information can be tapped and transferred and uploaded to NVivo software for categorization and analysis. The nexus between this two software will play a pivotal role in assisting researchers in continuing with their research work in unprecedented times like the one we are currently facing- COVID-19 pandemic.


Sponsored by:


Identity Boxes: An Arts-Based Approach at Distance

Nicole Brown
In my contribution I provide insight into the use of identity boxes as a data collection method to elicit experiences at distance. The project was created to ensure that participants would not be subjected to lengthy travels as they experienced fluctuating health issues. Participants were given a question and were asked to respond to the question using objects to represent their answers. They then took a photo of their box and shared that via email with a very brief statement of what they were trying to say. Once I had received the response to one question, I released the next question.
The basis for the identity box approach is that a) human understanding is embodied (Finlay, 2008, 2015), that b) language is insufficient to explain or describe certain experiences such as pain (e.g. Sontag, 2003; Scarry, 1985), and that c) human understanding and communication are metaphorical (Lakoff and Johnson, 2003).
In my reflection I show that the approach posed potential risks around the emotional vulnerability of participants, with some participants experiencing the project as cathartic and therapeutic, whilst others struggled with the process of thinking through objects. Although using a less conventional approach to research led to deeper, richer reflections and thus relevant, interesting data, concerns were raised around relevance, generalisability, and more generally the evaluation of the research. The paper concludes with a reconsideration of the identity boxes as a method of data collection at distance.


Sponsored by:


Thematic Analysis, Ideology critique and Linguistic Analysis as a Methodological Framework for Criti

Morag Munro
Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) seeks to investigate how social inequalities are constructed, legitimised and reproduced through discourse. CDA encompasses a diverse range of approaches which differ in their theoretical frameworks and methods (Wodak & Meyer, 2009). This presentation will first provide a brief introduction to CDA.
Next, using a CDA of thirteen national higher education digital teaching and learning strategies as an illustrative example (Munro, 2016), the presentation will describe a methodological approach to CDA informed by 'Ideology critique' (Held, 1980), and will demonstrate how Nvivo was leveraged in support of this approach. Ideological claims may be employed in order to implicitly or explicitly justify ideas or actions, by presenting them as inherently neutral, certain, natural, or commonsensical, and exempt from criticism; by implication other viewpoints may be marginalised (Held, 1980).
The research questions investigated were: 1. What ideologies underpin the strategies? 2. Are the claims made valid? and 3. Are other ideologies omitted?. Thematic Analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006) was first employed in order to identify, categorise, and refine recurring themes across the 138, 900-word corpus. Themes were next interrogated in order to uncover the social, cultural, and political motivations underpinning any ideological claims. Ideologies can be both enacted and obscured via language choices (Bloor and Bloor, 2007); the analysis therefore also paid particular attention to the impact of rhetorical techniques, lexical choices, as well as presentational, structural, and narrative devices. Nvivo was ultilised throughout the research process as a means to support organisation and analysis of the corpus.


Sponsored by:


Apps4eSafety: Using mobile apps to promote online safety for children and young people

Ana Francisca Monteiro
In today’s increasingly digital society, it is only natural that children and young people are more and more driven to move online. While doing so in a wide variety of devices, places and times, for a diversity of purposes and in a more autonomous fashion, their online safety faces renewed challenges. Furthermore, and despite developments in the field, promoting online safety continues to stand facing other significant barriers. Building on approaches to innovation, such as user-centred design thinking, technology enhanced learning and health technology, the project presented in this paper will implement a design-based research (DBR) methodology with the following purposes: i) produce a child-centred understanding of online safety needs and motivations for guidance; ii) evaluate the viability of using smartphone apps to offer child-friendly support and guidance; iv) analyse the potential for child-centred design to positively impact youngsters’ online safety; iv) deliver a framework that provides parents, teachers, health professionals, researchers and developers, among other stakeholders, with recommendations that take into account child-centred perspectives. A review of existing apps and a functional app prototype will be developed in collaboration with children/young people (8-14). A research and practice network will be created, involving other stakeholders. Data will be collected through observation, interviews and focus groups and submitted for thematic and discourse analysis.

Sponsored by:


Psychologically-informed Physiotherapy: using Online Interviews and Arts-Based Methods in Healthcare

Kate  Crook
Psychologically-informed Physiotherapy: using Online Interviews and Arts-Based Methods in Healthcare Research.
Author: Kate Crook, Leeds Institute of Medical Education, University of Leeds.
Psychologically-informed physiotherapy practice is recommended by the World Health Organisation and expected by the UK professional regulatory body. The use of psychology is supported by the evidence base and is encouraged in physiotherapy training, yet there is a lack of consistency and standardisation at undergraduate and post-qualifying level. The research project will explore newly qualified physiotherapists’ use, and understanding, of psychology within physiotherapy practice in the National Health Service in the UK.
Online interviews will be combined with an image produced by the physiotherapists representing their experience of psychology in physiotherapy. Undertaking fieldwork in a pandemic requires flexibility and innovation. Online interviews ensure flexibility while maintaining the benefits of face to face interviews, including engaging fully with participants, gathering rich data, and providing a platform for individual experiences to be heard. Arts-based methods are innovative and were chosen to work as an aid to the online interview. Creating an image will prompt reflection on the topic prior to the interview and encourage individuals to engage in a wider discussion of the topic. Such constructivist, qualitative methods are used infrequently within the traditional, biomedical field of physiotherapy. As such, the research project will combine innovative yet relevant methods to explore and give voice to a, hitherto, silent cohort of health professionals.


Sponsored by:


COVID-19 Impact on Research

Silvana di Gregorio
Report on survey of qualitative researchers on the impact the pandemic has had on their research.. The survey was conducted at the end of April and beginning of May when the crisis was at its peak in Europe and North America. Follow-up in--depth interviews were conducted in June-July as the pandemic receded in that part of the world. 

Sponsored by:


Close of Conference

Silvana di Gregorio
Stacy Penna
A thank you to everyone and some reminders about the conference survey, the giveaway contest, the virtual bag and upcoming events in the NVivo Community.

Sponsored by:


Sponsors







NVivo is the most powerful and intuitive research software for gaining richer insights from diverse data. It’s easy to learn and use, so you can quickly find the insights you need, and boost your research productivity. With NVivo, you can import, analyze and explore virtually any data source all in one place, from quantifiable demographic information to qualitative open-ended questions and interviews




NVivo Transcription is your automated transcription assistant for audio data in qualitative and mixed methods research. NVivo Transcription uses the latest technology to provide automated transcription, verbatim.




NVivo Collaboration Cloud uses the power of the cloud to enable teams of up to five people to work together on NVivo projects, no matter where they may be working. For larger teams all working in one central location, there’s NVivo Collaboration Server, that has the added security of your data being stored on your own organization’s on-site server.




Master NVivo with a certified course, customize your learning with focused modules, trainer-led virtual coaching sessions and onsite workshops or become an NVivo Certified Expert or Trainer.




The NVivo Community can help you expand your research network. We’re facilitating a program of activities that will support greater connection amongst the NVivo user community. The NVivo Community empowers researchers to connect across disciplines and organizations; join a community of practice around qualitative and mixed methods research, and share your research and learn from fellow researchers.




A powerful central student placement management tool - Sonia's comprehensive and flexible feature set is designed to help at key stages of your student placement program – ensuring seamless transition of student data, records management and efficiency through automation and workflow mapping







With over 50 years of publishing experience, our robust list of publications and digital resources has grown with the social sciences and continues to hold qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research to rigorous standards. SAGE content is here to help you at every step of your research journey, with textbooks that lay out the fundamentals of the research process, journals that highlight the latest innovations, the SAGE Research Methods platform that combines a library of content with interactive tools to guide research at all levels, and the online community MethodSpace




Alfasoft is a leading provider of licensing, support and services on solutions solving research and development challenges. We have more than 30 years of experience in scientific and technical software service and over 10 years delivering licenses, support, and training on NVivo.




We are a leading company in the implementation of technical and scientific software for the Latin American market. For more than 30 years, Software Shop has supported academic, corporate and governmental entities throughout the region implementing software for qualitative and quantitative analysis, risk management, project evaluation, among others.
We develop content about the use of NVivo for different fields and knowledge areas with a comprehensive training proposal, focused on the development of the conceptual and technical skills needed for successful development of qualitative and mixed projects in any field.




STATWORKS has extensive experience in implementing Data Science and Analytics Solutions in various organizations. By using our solution, organizations in various industries can reduce costs, improve performance, and gain the agility to respond to changing business needs. With more than 20 years of expertise, we have implemented various Data Analytics technologies across various industries in the Malaysia. 




Timberlake is a global brand with over thirty-five years of experience and expertise as a supplier of statistical, econometric and forecasting software packages; the delivery of quality training courses; and a consultancy service provider. We provide a total solution to our diverse range of clients across the fields of statistics, econometrics, forecasting, quantitate and qualitative research, epidemiology, finance, political and social sciences as well as data visualisation. We are official NVIVO partners internationally, in the UK, Spain, Portugal and the Middle East.  

 

NVivo Virtual Conference 2020

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Select 'Not Applicable' if not in USA or Canada
 
 
 
 
Visa, AMEX, MasterCard
 
 
  USD
Job Title
   
Organization
   
Indicate all the Special Interest Groups you are interested in for virtual networking and if you would like to receive further communications
 





 
Updating Registration
Submitting Registration